Alabama Demopolis lock reopens early

  • Spanish Market: Coal, Fertilizers, Freight, Metals, Oil products
  • 22/05/24

The failed Demopolis Lock, at the intersection of the Tombigbee Waterway and Black Warrior rivers in Alabama, has reopened two weeks earlier than projected.

The lock reopened on 16 May, ahead of the scheduled 30 May opening.

Vessels carrying commodities such as asphalt, coal, petcoke, metals and fertilizers have been able to pass through the lock without a long queue since the reopening, according to the US Army Corps of Engineers.

The lock had been closed since 16 January when the concrete sill underneath the lock doors failed. The lock was largely rebuilt over the ensuing four months

Traffic that would typically pass through the lock was rerouted during the closure.

Multiple steel mills in Alabama and Mississippi move some of their feedstock and finished product through the Demopolis lock. Those mills have 8.16mn short tons (st)/yr of flat, long, semifinished and pipe steel production capacity.


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Houthis strike bulk carrier in Gulf of Aden: US Centcom

Houthis strike bulk carrier in Gulf of Aden: US Centcom

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Forecast heatwave for Japan’s Tohoku to boost power use


13/06/24
13/06/24

Forecast heatwave for Japan’s Tohoku to boost power use

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Japan’s scrap export tender slips in June


13/06/24
13/06/24

Japan’s scrap export tender slips in June

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Competing US farm bill drafts boost SAF


12/06/24
12/06/24

Competing US farm bill drafts boost SAF

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US coal unit closures to pick up in 2025


12/06/24
12/06/24

US coal unit closures to pick up in 2025

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