MME demite número dois da pasta

  • Spanish Market: Biofuels, Electricity, Oil products
  • 11/01/24

O secretário-executivo do Ministério de Minas e Energia (MME), Efrain Pereira da Cruz, foi demitido nesta quinta-feira.

Cruz assumiu o posto em março de 2023, após um longo período de discussões sobre quem deveria ser o braço direito do ministro Alexandre Silveira.

Entretanto, a nomeação não foi bem recebida pelo setor porque ele já esteve envolvido em questões polêmicas durante sua gestão como diretor da Agência Nacional de Energia Elétrica (Aneel), algo que se repetiu em seu novo posto.

Cruz será substituído por Arthur Cerqueira Valério, que comandava a assessoria jurídica do MME após 14 anos atuando como consultor em outras autarquias.


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19/06/24

Nigeria tightens sulphur cap on oil product imports

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Australian opposition releases nuclear power plan


19/06/24
19/06/24

Australian opposition releases nuclear power plan

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South Korea buys less UAE naphtha in May


19/06/24
19/06/24

South Korea buys less UAE naphtha in May

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Malaysia's Lotte Titan yet to produce on-spec aromatics


19/06/24
19/06/24

Malaysia's Lotte Titan yet to produce on-spec aromatics

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