Petrobras elevará produção de diesel S10

  • Spanish Market: Crude oil, LPG, Oil products
  • 18/01/24

A Petrobras retomará as obras de expansão da Refinaria Abreu e Lima (Rnest), aumentando a produção de diesel S10 em 13.000 m³/d até 2028.

Na segunda metade de 2024, a estatal reiniciará a construção do Trem 2 na refinaria, visando elevar sua capacidade de processamento de petróleo de 230.000 b/d para 260.000 b/d, também em 2028. A melhoria aumentará a produção de derivados de petróleo da companhia – incluindo gasolina, GLP e nafta, mas principalmente diesel S10.

As obras para a implementação da unidade haviam sido interrompidas em 2015.

O investimento permitirá que o Brasil seja mais "autossuficiente na produção de combustíveis, reduzindo a demanda de importação", disse a empresa.

"A Petrobras estima um aumento de produção de diesel da ordem de 40pc nos próximos anos", afirmou o presidente da estatal, Jean Paul Prates.

Neste ano, a companhia também começará obras para proporcionar aumento de carga, melhor escoamento de produtos leves e maior capacidade de processamento de petróleo do pré-sal no Trem 1, unidade já existente da Rnest, até o primeiro trimestre de 2025.

Além disso, a empresa espera instalar a primeira planta do país a transformar óxido de enxofre e óxido de nitrogênio em um novo produto não especificado. O projeto já está em andamento e deve iniciar operações ainda em 2024.

A retomada da ampliação na Rnest é parte do plano estratégico da Petrobras para 2024-28 e do Novo Programa de Aceleração do Crescimento (PAC), do governo federal.

O presidente Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva e Prates estarão presentes na cerimônia oficial de retomada das obras na refinaria hoje. O valor do investimento não foi revelado.

A Rnest é localizada no Complexo Industrial do Porto de Suape, em Pernambuco, e é o "principal polo para a Petrobras nas regiões Norte e Nordeste, com acesso fácil por cabotagem para mercados consumidores", informou a empresa.


Related news posts

Argus illuminates the markets by putting a lens on the areas that matter most to you. The market news and commentary we publish reveals vital insights that enable you to make stronger, well-informed decisions. Explore a selection of news stories related to this one.

18/06/24

Phillips 66 targets high Rodeo runs

Phillips 66 targets high Rodeo runs

Houston, 18 June (Argus) — Low-carbon feedstock and sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) opportunities will support strong run rates from Phillips 66's converted renewables plant in Rodeo, California, this year, chief executive Mark Lashier said today. The outlook heralded a high output from the converted Rodeo refinery ramping up toward 50,000 b/d of renewable diesel capacity by the end of this month, despite historic lows in state and federal incentives for the fuel. "Where we are today, economically, yes, the credits are kind of compressed, but feedstocks are lower than we anticipated as well," Lashier told the JP Morgan Energy, Power & Renewables conference. "We still see good economic incentives to run and run full." The US independent refiner had started up pre-treatment units at the plant to begin processing lower-carbon feedstocks for renewable diesel in July and August, he said, consistent with previous guidance. "That's how you really make money in these assets — you get the lowest-carbon intensity feedstocks at the best value and process them through the hydrocrackers," Lashier said. " The facility would also bring online 10,000 b/d of renewable jet fuel blendstock production supporting 20,000 b/d of blended sustainable aviation fuel, a product Phillips 66 had not targeted in the initial concept for the site, he said. Both state and federal incentives to supply renewable diesel along the west coast have fallen as the fuel inundates those markets. Renewable diesel alone made up roughly 57pc of California's liquid diesel pool and generated 40pc of the Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) credits in the state's market-based transportation fuel carbon reduction program by the end of last year. The supply of lower-carbon fuels, led by renewable diesel, to the west coast LCFS markets have outstripped demand for deficit-generating petroleum fuels and led to growing reserves of available credits for compliance. California amassed more than 23mn metric tonnes of credits by the end of last year — more than enough left over after satisfying all of the new deficits generated last year to offset them a second time. The volume of unused credits has sent their price tumbling to nine-year lows. Oregon and Washington credits, which are needed for similar but distinct programs in those states, have similarly dropped as renewable diesel supplies spread out along the west coast. Gasoline consumption generates almost all new deficits in California. Year-over-year demand for the fuel nationwide has fallen below expectations this spring, Lashier said. "We are not really seeing things pick up like a lot of us expected to," he said. Lower-income customers struggling with higher costs on everything they buy may have forgone vacations, he said. The drop in broader buying power meanwhile had rippled through diesel consumption, he said. "As we move towards more expensive energy sources, that's the part of the economy that gets squeezed as well," Lashier said. "Hopefully we move through that and reverse and that part of the economy can pick up as well as the higher end of the economy." By Elliott Blackburn Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

US asphalt imports to Brazil reach 5-year high


18/06/24
18/06/24

US asphalt imports to Brazil reach 5-year high

Sao Paulo, 18 June (Argus) — Brazilian asphalt imports from the US reached their highest level in the past decade in May after drier weather and competitive prices boosted demand. The US was the largest source of Brazilian asphalt imports in May, contributing to nearly 12,000 metric tonnes (t) or 61pc of all imports, according to Siscomex import and export data. The last time Brazil imported so much from the US was in January 2023, when 10,800t arrived at Brazilian ports. In April, the US Gulf's premium over Mediterranean asphalt reached its narrowest point in 2024 at about $7/st, which can explain why imports rose in May. Precipitation levels were also 60pc lower in some regions of the country during April and May, according to Brazil's National Meteorology Institute, which boosted paving projects. Total asphalt imports in Brazil increased by almost 10 times in May compared with April. Asphalt imports totaled 19,50052 t in May, which is 28pc higher compared with May 2023. Imports from January to May were almost 80,000t, 46pc more than the same period in 2023. This is because of municipal elections in October, which results in more road projects to appeal to voters. Russia was the source for around 5,30250t of asphalt imports in May. Most Russian imports tend to be polymer modified asphalt (PMA), a dry bulk product that costs on average 15pc more than liquid asphalt because of the energy costs required to reheat it to a liquid state. Although it costs more, solid asphalt is used as an alternative in markets without the infrastructure to receive and store liquid asphalt, such as in southern Brazil. By Julio Viana Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Q&A: LGE calls for more EU backing as Congress begins


18/06/24
18/06/24

Q&A: LGE calls for more EU backing as Congress begins

Brussels, 18 June (Argus) — The European Parliament election on 6-9 June is expected to result in centre-right Ursula von der Leyen remaining as president of the European Commission despite an increase in support for far-right groups. The election came just before European LPG association Liquid Gas Europe's (LGE) 2024 Congress in Lyon, France, over 18-20 June. Argus' EU correspondent Dafydd ab Iago spoke with the LGE's general manager, Ewa Abramiuk-Lete, about the election and the EU's climate and energy policies on the eve of the conference: What do you want from the newly constituted parliament and commission? A positive overarching framework from Brussels is needed to drive demand for renewable gases such as bioLPG and renewable and recycled carbon DME in heating and transport. For instance, retrofitting diesel or gasoline engines after 2035 is a potential solution for legacy fleets. But this goal is currently missing at the EU level. Energy taxation is another critical issue, with the current directive unchanged for more than 20 years. It's crucial that revenue from energy taxation is re-invested into the production of renewable fuels to avoid a vicious cycle. Do you expect parliament to push for a clearer future for renewable liquid gas fuels despite plans to phase out ICE [internal combustion engine] vehicles? There's obviously a trend towards electrification. And as set out in the current legislation, the European Commission will come forward with definitions of CO2-neutral fuels. But member states have woken up to the gravity of the ban on ICE vehicles. Legislative solutions need to come really fast. We don't want to wait two more years until the effect of the new CO2 standards for cars fully kicks in. Can a new parliament tweak existing legislation on the EU's 2030 climate and energy goals? The ICE phase-out has intensified scrutiny of the Green Deal, at the member state level and in the European Parliament. But significant changes to the 2030 goals are unlikely as the targets are set for 2030. And Europe remains committed to achieving climate neutrality by 2050. Considerations to be examined include the role of liquid gases, especially in rural areas that account for about 3pc of EU energy demand. They rely on LPG as an off-grid solution. Does the EU need to rethink the 2040 goals? The suggested 2040 strategy set out by the outgoing commission still has to translate into legal proposals for parliament and member states to decide upon. The major question is where the industry will get to in 2040. Achieving 90pc net greenhouse gas savings by 2040, and then climate neutrality by 2050, will require significant investment. We expect an increase in the production of renewable gases by 2030, and a further scale-up towards 2040. But the industry also needs investor security. Some countries such as Italy, the Czech Republic and Spain have mentioned renewable LPG in their national energy and climate plans. That provides some degree of investor security. Will LPG still be part of the EU's heating and transport picture as we move towards 2030 and 2035? Yes, particularly for industrial use as Russian gas is being phased out. Major industries such as steel and ceramics need high heat that was previously supplied by natural gas, which cannot be replaced everywhere with electricity. There is significant interest from energy-intensive industries. For heating and boilers, the commission is developing guidance documents defining fossil boilers, which must outline a future pathway for boilers, especially important for off-grid areas. Those guidance documents need to recognise that boilers can run on both fossil fuels and renewable blends. Is an extension of the ETS [emissions trading system] to transport and heating proceeding smoothly for the LPG sector? The expansion of the ETS is new for many in the sector, requiring firms to establish trading for ETS allowances. While some companies were already under the ETS, the EU-wide extension now includes medium and small-sized firms, which face crucial upcoming deadlines. Companies must estimate their emissions and purchase allowances, adding costs for consumers. And implementation has been challenging for some member states, particularly in identifying relevant companies falling under the ETS, making the process more difficult than anticipated. Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Q&A: DCC Energy eyes further LPG and low-carbon growth


18/06/24
18/06/24

Q&A: DCC Energy eyes further LPG and low-carbon growth

London, 18 June (Argus) — Dublin-based DCC Energy continues to expand and diversify, completing 15 acquisitions over the past year that included two in the LPG sector. The company, which owns several LPG retail subsidiaries in Europe, the US and Hong Kong, bought Germany's Progas and the US' San Isabel Services Propane at the same time as it increasingly moves into low-carbon energy markets such as solar, biofuels and energy management services. Argus' Oliver Binks spoke with DCC Energy chief executive Fabian Ziegler about the company's 2023-24 results and its future plans: DCC Energy has been moving into new markets as part of the energy transition. What share of the company does LPG represent? We launched our Cleaner Energy in Your Power strategy last year, aiming to double our profit [and halve carbon emissions] by 2030. We think backwards from the customer, helping them through the energy trilemma, and provide energy solutions consisting of molecules — increasingly green — and often self-generated renewable electrons. We are ahead of schedule. LPG is about half of our profits but only 15pc of our carbon emissions. We believe in LPG's longevity. It is a societally very useful fuel. Like the World LPG Association renaming itself to World Liquid Gas Association, we now move our own definitions from LPG to LG — liquid gas. DCC Energy has said it plans to grow its LPG offering by 50pc by 2030. Which areas geographically and sectorally is the company targeting? Our LG journey took us from Ireland to [the UK], to Europe and to the US. We have just strengthened our position in Germany with the acquisition of Progas. A key growth region is the US. We made a small acquisition there last year. We are currently focused on making our business operationally excellent, namely around serving our customers. For now, the strategy places more emphasis on strengthening in each market rather than expansion into new territory. We like our residential businesses, but we are targeting more growth in the commercial sector, where the case for multi-energy packages is greater. Overall, we aim to grow our LG business, but we need to create more sustainable credibility for LG. We are scaling up biopropane sales across Europe and trialling rDME [renewable DME] in the UK and Sweden, particularly with commercial and industrial customers, to enhance LG's relevance as a long-term low-carbon solution for Europe. DCC Energy's profit rose strongly in the 2023-24 fiscal year ending in March, but overall sales volumes dropped slightly. How much did the LPG segment fare? LG is often a mature market in Europe, however our LG sales volumes increased modestly in the year and we believe they can keep growing. We continue to drive the move from oil to gas for commercial and industrial customers. Many customers really appreciate the ability to make affordable CO2 reductions and having their own energy in a tank reliably supplied by DCC companies. LPG sales in the UK and Ireland came under pressure from a warm winter but still grew on expanding commercial and industrial deliveries. What drove this? Our businesses in Ireland and the UK continue to grow owing to diverse customer segments that are not all weather dependent. Under our Cleaner Energy in Your Power strategy, we act as an energy transition partner. Customers recognise the fiscal and carbon benefits of LG over heavier forms of fuel, driving growth in the transition. And some customers are investing in new off-grid facilities and choosing LG as their fuel sources. And it helps that we can provide broader energy packages entailing electron solutions. We also aim to increase our supply resilience with storage access at Teesside and our Avonmouth terminal project. DCC Energy also reported strong profit growth in Scandinavia driven by LPG. What are your plans in this region? We saw significant LG sales growth [in Scandinavia] last year when natural gas prices skyrocketed and customers wanted security of supply. Our Scandinavian business aims to lead the energy transition, with a focus on understanding our customers' needs and helping them reduce their carbon emissions. We aim to support large-scale production of rDME in Sweden and Norway and to see 50pc of sales coming from a wide range of renewable products by 2030. We have successfully run pilot tests in Sweden with rDME-LG blends at customers' sites, we invested in a rDME-LG blending facility, aiming for first customer deliveries in 2024, and received government funding for replacing LG with 100pc rDME at Bjorneborg Steel. DCC has acquired Germany's Progas and the US' San Isabel Services Propane over the past year. Do you have plans for further takeovers in the LPG sector? We have been one of the most active global buyers of LG businesses for several decades and will continue to pursue attractive acquisitions that strengthen our existing businesses, expand our markets and bring other important capabilities. We see a lot of potential in the US, where our DCC Propane business has achieved significant growth through many acquisitions since we entered that market in 2018. We continue to see many interesting opportunities in the US, which is far more fragmented than most European markets, with the top 20 propane retailers accounting for 40pc of the market and over 4,000 independent [firms accounting for 60pc]. Progas owns the Brunsbuttel and Duisburg LPG terminals in Germany. Given Poland faces a looming supply deficit when EU imports from Russia are banned from December, is DCC Energy looking at supplying Poland from these sites? The Brunsbuttel and Duisburg terminals were welcomed into DCC's portfolio in northwest Europe, where their primary role remains unchanged — to provide supply security to our customers. Spare capacity might be used to support the Polish market. We see the capacity of our existing infrastructure in Germany to be sufficient to support our business there. Earlier this year, we created a central supply and trading team out of Amsterdam, called DCC LPG Procurement, which will look at more infrastructure plays. But we are not in the supply business for the sake of it. Our strategy focuses on our customers and providing them with sustainable solutions. Germany is a good example. Our priority in Germany is a seamless integration of Progas and Tega, [acquired in 2018], that is good for customers and our employees. And building out a leading energy management services business. Flogas recently commissioned the Teesside LPG terminal near to Dimeta's upcoming rDME plant. Does Flogas plan to distribute DME or other renewable gases from the site? Being at an energy hub clearly opens possibilities for sourcing low-carbon energy sources such as rDME that can be unlocked for our customers. With the likelihood that rDME will need to be blended with propane to achieve supply without changing infrastructure and equipment, it will be important for rDME sources to be logistically close to sources of propane. Teesside is well placed to offer this solution. At what stage is the Avonmouth terminal project at? The first 17,000t tank is fully refurbished and two truck racks have been put in place such that Avonmouth terminal now already plays an important role in providing supply security to our customers in southwest England. A further 17,000t tank will be refurbished and a connection will be made to the Bristol port to enable midsize LPG carrier imports. We expect first imports in 2026-27. Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Tropical storm warning for South Texas coast: Update


18/06/24
18/06/24

Tropical storm warning for South Texas coast: Update

Updates with closure of Galveston, Texas City ports. New York, 18 June (Argus) — A tropical storm warning has been issued for parts of south Texas and northeastern Mexico, bringing with it the risk of heavy rainfall and flooding. The warning is in effect for the Texas coast from Port O'Connor south to the mouth of the Rio Grande, as well as the northeastern coast of Mexico, according to the National Hurricane Center. "The disturbance is very large with rainfall, coastal flooding, and wind impacts likely to occur far from the center along the coasts of Texas and northeastern Mexico," the center said overnight. Maximum sustained winds this morning remained near 40 mph and the disturbance is forecast to become a tropical storm by Wednesday. The system has been classified as a potential tropical cyclone by the center since it has not yet become better organized, but is expected to become the first named storm system of the year by early Wednesday. The port of Corpus Christi in South Texas and the Houston Ship Channel remained open as of Tuesday morning, but the nearby ports of Galveston and Texas City closed to inbound and outbound shipping traffic at 10pm ET Monday due to heavy weather, the US Coast Guard said. The system was expected to disrupt ship-to-ship transfer operations off the Texas coast as of Monday evening because of heavy seas. In the Gulf of Mexico, the transfer typically is from an Aframax or Suezmax onto a very large crude carrier (VLCC) at designated lightering zones near Corpus Christi, Galveston and Beaumont-Port Arthur. Prolonged lightering delays can prevent crude tanker tonnage from becoming available and exert upward pressure on freight rates, while also adding to demurrage fees. The storm is expected to turn towards the west-northwest and west tonight and Wednesday, with the system forecast to approach the western Gulf coast late Wednesday, the NHC said. Rainfall totals of 5 to 10 inches are seen across northeast Mexico into South Texas, with maximum totals of 15 inches possible. Flash and urban flooding are likely to follow with river flooding. By Stephen Cunningham and Tray Swanson Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Business intelligence reports

Get concise, trustworthy and unbiased analysis of the latest trends and developments in oil and energy markets. These reports are specially created for decision makers who don’t have time to track markets day-by-day, minute-by-minute.

Learn more