Lao Kaiyuan targets 2mn t/yr MOP capacity by end-2025

  • Spanish Market: Fertilizers
  • 07/03/24

Laos-based potash producer Lao Kaiyuan has started construction of a third MOP unit, which is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2025 and take its production capacity to 2mn t/yr.

The third unit will have a 1mn t/yr capacity, up from a previously expected 500,000 t/yr, representing phase two of the company's expansion plans announced in 2022. Phase 1 involved building a 500,000 t/yr unit, which was commissioned in May 2023, taking current capacity to 1mn t/yr.

The company has also completed the expansion of its granulation unit from 200,000 t/yr to 400,000 t/yr.

Lao Kaiyuan is currently operating at full capacity.


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