Combustível do Futuro deve avançar rápido, diz Abicom

  • Spanish Market: Biofuels, Natural gas
  • 27/02/24

A Câmara dos Deputados deve aprovar rapidamente o projeto de lei (PL) Combustível do Futuro, disse o presidente da Associação Brasileira de Importadores de Combustíveis (Abicom), Sérgio Araújo, à Argus.

Nesta segunda-feira, o deputado federal Arnaldo Jardim (Cidadania-SP), relator do projeto, apresentou um relatório com mudanças no texto original.

"A demora excessiva para soltar o relatório me faz acreditar que ele [Jardim] já tenha divulgado um relatório costurado e amarrado com os principais decisores – incluindo os ministérios de Minas e Energia e da Agricultura", contou Araújo, acrescentando que o deputado é muito influente no Congresso.

Recentemente, o Combustível do Futuro também foi apensado a um projeto semelhante de autoria do deputado Alceu Moreira, que corre em caráter emergencial e pode facilitar a tramitação do pacote verde.

"Acho que o relatório está pronto para ser votado, principalmente na Câmara, e ser aprovado rapidamente", disse o presidente da Abicom à Argus.

O texto precisa ser aprovado pelas duas casas do Congresso e sancionado pelo presidente Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva para ser transformado em lei. Mas é provável que o PL enfrente um debate maior no Senado, Araújo afirmou.

A aceitação do relatório não é unânime no setor de combustíveis fósseis, já que que os principais consumidores de diesel, como a Confederação Nacional do Transporte (CNT) e a Associação Nacional dos Fabricantes de Veículos Automotores (Anfavea), não estão satisfeitos com a adição do aumento do mandato de mistura do biodiesel na revisão proposta por Jardim, apontou Araújo.

"Deve acontecer uma reação bem forte dos principais consumidores, como as distribuidoras", ele acrescentou.

A última versão do projeto inclui o biodiesel no escopo e estabelece um cronograma de elevação anual do percentual de adição obrigatória no período de 2025 a 2030, de modo a chegar em 20pc e subir para 25pc a partir de 2031. Atualmente, a mescla do biocombustível no diesel está em 12pc.

O texto revisado também propõe a instituição do Programa Nacional do Biometano e abre espaço para elevar o percentual obrigatório do etanol anidro na gasolina dos atuais 27,5pc para 35pc, após testes de viabilidade técnica.

O governo Lula apresentou o PL pela primeira vez em setembro, como parte de esforços de transição energética para expandir o uso de combustíveis renováveis e reduzir emissões.


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14/06/24

Q&A: Phillips 66 to balance fossil and renewable fuels

Q&A: Phillips 66 to balance fossil and renewable fuels

Houston, 14 June (Argus) — With Phillips 66's Rodeo, California, refinery expected to ramp up to over 50,000 b/d of renewable fuels production by the end of this quarter, all eyes are on the refiner for what is next. Zhanna Golodryga , executive vice president of emerging energy and sustainability for Phillips 66, talked to Argus at the refiner's Houston headquarters about how the company looks at investments, its focus on sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) production and why Texas might be the Silicon Valley of the energy transition. The conversation has been edited for clarity and length. When Rodeo reaches full capacity, it will represent about 3pc of your overall output. What will your fleet look like longer-term and what will be the renewables/petroleum split? Not all the refineries in our portfolio are created equal, and when we look at them what I call them is "lower-carbon energy hubs". Not low, lower, because it's going to be a combination of everything. We're looking at the assets we have in the portfolio and what we can do to help bring in lower carbon solutions and what can we build out. Our focus is going to continue to be SAF. We understand the limitations of feedstocks and we have a very strong commercial organization that is now working on providing feedstocks just for Rodeo. But we're also thinking about what we can do to bring in different feedstocks. Energy transition opportunities aren't going to replace our traditional fossil fuel refining. It's an "and", not an "or". You've highlighted a future focus on SAF. Does that mean a move away from renewable diesel (RD)? I think we have flexibility to do both and it will be market driven going forward. We have to look at demand but there is demand for SAF globally, not just in the US. Demand for gasoline is not as strong as demand for diesel and sustainable aviation fuel. That is what our focus is and then we want to diversify the feedstock. What is your outlook for RD? I think RD is here for quite some time. It's hard to predict what's going to happen by 2050 but I think we will have the demand. It's going to take a long time to electrify all future transportation. I think we have a much better opportunity for now to focus on what we're really good at. That's fuels, renewable fuels. You have faced activist investor pressure calling for Phillips 66 to focus on its core refining business. How do investors feel about the Rodeo conversion and your future plans? We have taken a pragmatic approach to the energy transition. We have criteria that we follow prior to taking any projects over the line, specifically the energy transition type projects. They must meet five key prerequisites: the right returns, the right technology that has been proven at scale, the right regulatory environment, preferably involve a partnership and be done at the right time. We have to prove with Rodeo that this is, as I call it, our license to continue to grow the business. This is our license to operate additional energy transition business. This one is going to be done extremely well. What are the policy tailwinds and headwinds to your renewables investments? When we look at our opportunities in our energy transition portfolio, we are building our economic model for them to produce the right returns without any incentives. That is our starting point. On the other hand, the IRA [US Inflation Reduction Act] has been a bipartisan initiative and we think it's going to stand for the greater good of the planet. We have to think globally, as we have the Humber refinery in the UK. It's interesting for us to see what's possible in the US with the IRA incentives, versus more of a stick in Europe. But the challenge for us is permitting and timing. We probably could have brought Rodeo online sooner if we didn't have to wait for some permits. Our headquarters are in Texas and Texas is the "energy transition Silicon Valley". I'm repeating someone's words and those are the words of Bill Gates. But I believe that. We're perfectly positioned on the Gulf coast to go to the next phase and build something here. You've mentioned Phillips 66's 265,000 b/d Sweeny refinery in Old Ocean, Texas, as a low carbon energy hub. Does that mean it is a candidate for renewable fuel conversion or co-processing? It could be an option, maybe not at Sweeny, but in the Gulf coast, maybe Lake Charles. It's driven by our hardware, just like what we've done at Rodeo. By Nathan Risser Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Low-CO2 biofuel feedstock imports to rise: USDA


13/06/24
13/06/24

Low-CO2 biofuel feedstock imports to rise: USDA

New York, 13 June (Argus) — A new US tax credit kicking off next year that is more generous for fuels that produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions will likely spur more imports of low-carbon feedstocks, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) said in a report this week. A raft of government incentives, including the federal renewable fuel standard and low-carbon fuel standards (LCFS) in states like California, has already spurred a boom in renewable diesel production, upping demand for feedstocks that can be used to make the fuel. The US was a net soybean oil importer for the first time ever in 2023 because of strong demand from domestic refineries, and the value of US imports of animal fats and vegetable oils more than doubled from 2020 to 2023 according to the report. That trend could become even more pronounced next year as the Inflation Reduction Act's 45Z tax credit, which offers up to $1.75/USG for sustainable aviation fuel and up to $1/USG for other fuels like renewable diesel, comes into force. The credit can only be claimed for fuel produced in the US, likely cutting biofuel imports and sending more feedstocks that would have been refined abroad to the US instead, the report says. The 45Z credit will also be more generous to fuels with lower carbon intensity, upping demand for waste feedstocks like used cooking oil that already fetch greater discounts in LCFS programs. Fast-rising imports of China-origin used cooking oil have already frustrated some agricultural groups, which lose out if there are more ample supplies of waste feedstocks. The report says that while soybean oil was the "crucial feedstock" allowing for the recent growth in US renewable diesel, its share of the feedstock mix has been trending downwards because of competition from lower-carbon feedstocks and lower-cost canola oil from Canada. While soybean oil exports have plunged because of the renewable diesel boom, they could recover slightly if refineries increasingly turning to waste feedstocks cuts into US soybean oil's current premium over global vegetable oils. The report adds that soybean oil's role in renewable diesel production is also at risk from rising supplies of soybean meal, which is produced alongside oil at crush plants and where the global demand picture is less clear. "Based on global demand for soybean meal, soybean oil cannot continue to fuel renewable diesel production growth at current rates during the next few years without major changes to global soybean meal demand, shifts in exporter market shares, or lower supplies in other exporting countries," the report says. By Cole Martin Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Renewable natural gas not ‘major’ for climate: Chevron


13/06/24
13/06/24

Renewable natural gas not ‘major’ for climate: Chevron

New York, 13 June (Argus) — The growth of renewable natural gas (RNG) production is great news for the climate, but "to say that it is having a major impact by itself is difficult," the president of Chevron's global gas division said this week at an industry gathering. The US oil major, which has invested in RNG facilities in California , Michigan and elsewhere in recent years, has also boosted its conventional gas production on the heels of a crude-focused acquisition of a Denver-based producer. "I don't want to get called out (for) greenwashing or whatever because the volume is just very small compared to the overall portfolio," Chevron gas division president Freeman Shaheen said at the Northeast LDC Gas Forum in Boston, Massachusetts. Advocates for RNG hail the fuel, comprising methane from landfills and animal waste projects that is processed into pipeline-quality gas, as a boon for the climate. This is not only because its use displaces conventional natural gas produced in hydrocarbon drilling — so-called ‘fossil gas' — but because its production takes methane that would have been released directly into the atmosphere and burns it as fuel, releasing CO₂ — a less potent greenhouse gas — instead. But RNG today comprises just 0.5pc of the North American gas market. Even with continued policy support and technological development, Wood Mackenzie projects it will grow to just 4 Bcf/d (113mn m³/d), or 3pc of the market, by 2050. This is why some policymakers, such as Massachusetts' utilities regulatory, have rejected gas distributors' calls to decarbonize the gas system with RNG. The energy industry simply has not invested enough in RNG over the past several decades for it to reach the scale needed to play a bigger role in cutting emissions, Shaheen said. By Julian Hast Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

UK political parties repeat existing stances on energy


13/06/24
13/06/24

UK political parties repeat existing stances on energy

London, 13 June (Argus) — The two main UK political parties have set out their plans, including on energy and climate change, with just three weeks until the general election. Energy security and the cost to consumers is a recurring theme for both, but the manifestos present some marked differences in approach to the energy transition. Both the incumbent Conservative and opposition Labour parties doubled down on existing positions in their respective manifestos. The Conservative party said that it remains committed to the UK's 2050 net zero emissions target, but promises a "pragmatic and proportionate" route. The party's manifesto guarantees "no new green levies or charges while accelerating the rollout of renewables". The UK's net zero goal is legally-binding, and was passed with significant cross-party support under a Conservative government in 2019. The Conservatives have been in power since 2010, and fielded five prime ministers in that time. Recent polling data show a substantial lead for Labour, which performed well at local elections in May. Labour placed strong focus on the opportunity the transition offers, saying that it would place the UK at the "forefront of climate action by creating the green jobs of the future at home and driving forward the energy transition on the global stage". The party has committed to zero-carbon power by 2030, although it would "maintain a strategic reserve of gas power stations to guarantee security of supply", it said. The Conservative manifesto reiterates the party's plans to build new gas-fired power plants. The party had previously committed to a decarbonised power grid by 2035, in line with a G7 pledge, although that is not mentioned in its manifesto. The two main parties clearly diverge on their approaches to North Sea oil and gas production. The Conservatives aim to keep the windfall tax — which effectively results in a 75pc rate — on oil and gas producers in place "until 2028-29, unless prices fall back to normal sooner". Labour confirmed plans to lift the rate to 78pc and run the tax until the end of the next parliament, which is likely to be mid-2029. Labour is also clear that it "will not revoke existing licences" in the North Sea, but it will not issue any new licences — for oil, gas or coal. The Conservatives restated the party's aim to legislate for annual North Sea licensing rounds . Both parties back nuclear energy, including small modular reactors — though those are unlikely to be operational until after 2030. And both pledge to cut planning bureaucracy and tackle grid connections. Labour's plans to "double onshore wind, triple solar power, and quadruple offshore wind by 2030" would result in installed capacity of 31GW, 48GW and 59GW, respectively, from a baseline of end-2023. The Conservatives' target to triple offshore wind by the end of the next parliament would put installed capacity at 44GW in 2029 — below the 50GW target for 2030 set in 2022 — while it said it supports solar and onshore wind in some circumstances. Finance in focus Both parties are keen to pull in private-sector investment, while Labour took up an original Conservative pledge to "make the UK the green finance capital of the world". And both pledge to address the cost of energy for consumers — Labour through local power generation projects and home insulation upgrades, and the Conservatives by ruling out any further "green levies". The latter plans to reverse London's expansion of the ultra-low emissions zone — originally planned by Conservative then-mayor and later prime minister Boris Johnson. Labour said that it would restore a phase-out date of 2030 for new internal combustion engine cars — which prime minister Rishi Sunak in September pushed back to 2035 . On an international level, both parties mention climate leadership at summits such as UN Cops. The Conservatives pledged to "ring-fence" the UK's climate finance commitments, while Labour committed to restore development spending to 0.7pc of gross national income "as soon as fiscal circumstances allow". By Georgia Gratton Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

TTF front-month trades at highest since December 2023


13/06/24
13/06/24

TTF front-month trades at highest since December 2023

London, 13 June (Argus) — The Netherlands' TTF front-month gas price was trading near the highest level since last year this morning and afternoon as LNG supply outages contribute to market tightness. The price traded at €36.12/MWh ($38.88/MWh) on the Intercontinental exchange at 15:00 London time today. If the price holds around this level until the close it would be the highest front-month assessment since 8 December 2023. The contract opened at €35.43/MWh on the exchange, up from Argus' Wednesday assessment of €35.20/MWh, and climbed in the morning on the news of an extended shutdown at an Australian LNG terminal. Operations at Chevron's 8.9mn t/yr Wheatstone LNG export terminal in Australia may be disrupted for several weeks , the firm announced today. Loadings from the terminal have been halted since 10 June because of unplanned maintenance. The outage was previously expected to last until 14 June and disrupt delivery of 3-4 cargoes, but could now last until 19-26 June, according to market sources and loading schedules. Although Europe rarely imports cargoes directly from Australia, the reduction in deliveries to northeast Asia will mean prices in that region have to increase to attract more Atlantic-basin cargoes, pulling up the TTF at the same time. Quantities of US LNG on the water have risen sharply since mid-May according to Vortexa data, despite no incentive for floating storage, suggesting that more vessels are taking the longer route to deliver cargoes to northeast Asia ( see US LNG on the water graph ). The Wheatstone shutdown comes on top of a second quarter of planned and unplanned outages at other export terminals. High utilisation rates at terminals mean any downtime translates directly into lower deliveries than expected and contributes to LNG market tightness. The US' 33mn t/yr Sabine Pass terminal may be undergoing maintenance this month, based on reductions in feedgas deliveries. An unplanned outage last month cut deliveries from Australia's 15.6mn t/yr Gorgon terminal, while Peru's 4.4mn t/yr Peru LNG terminal is down for two weeks of maintenance. In addition to LNG supply disruptions, unplanned constraints at Norwegian offshore infrastructure at the beginning of this month removed supply from the European market and pushed up prices. A crack in a pipeline in an offshore hub discovered on 2 June caused a shut-in at the Nyhamna processing plant. The cut in gas production from connected fields over the five days that it took for the plant to restart was equivalent to 2-3 LNG cargoes. Although Norwegian gas production and global LNG loadings have been lower than previously expected, demand in Europe remains muted. Stocks in the EU are higher than ever for the time of year, while industrial demand remains low. Temperatures have held well below normal in much of western Europe since the beginning of the month. Heating demand has been higher than normal for the period, but the weather is already so warm that conditions much cooler than normal can only spur small increases in heating demand. Gas-fired generation was weak in May as increased renewables capacity, strong nuclear output and low aggregate demand cut into the incentive for power sector gas burn. By Rhys Talbot TTF front-month US LNG on the water, mn t Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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