Enchentes afetam operações de empresas no Sul do Brasil

  • : Agriculture, Metals, Petrochemicals
  • 24/05/08

Diversas empresas brasileiras suspenderam operações no Rio Grande do Sul em razão das chuvas intensas que causaram diversos alagamentos e danos à infraestrutura.

As enchentes ocasionadas pelo recorde de chuvas geraram pelo menos 83 mortes e 111 pessoas desaparecidas, de acordo com o governo estadual. Mais de 23.000 pessoas foram obrigadas a deixarem suas casas em meio a danos generalizados, incluindo pontes e rodovias inundadas em diversas cidades.

A barragem da usina hidrelétrica 14 de Julho, com capacidade de 100MW, no rio das Antas, rompeu na semana passada em meio às fortes chuvas. A Companhia Energética Rio das Antas (Ceran), que opera a usina, implementou um plano de evacuação de emergência em 1 de maio.

  • A produtora de aço Gerdau informou em 6 de maio que suspendeu suas operações em duas unidades no estado até que seja assegurada a "segurança e proteção das pessoas". A empresa não divulgou o volume de produção de aço dessas unidades.
  • A empresa de logística Rumo interrompeu parcialmente suas operações e informou que os "danos aos ativos ainda estão sendo devidamente mensurados".
  • A gigante petroquímica Braskem desligou duas unidades no complexo petroquímico Triunfo, como uma medida de prevenção em decorrência dos "eventos climáticos extremos" no estado, afirmou em 3 de maio. A empresa adicionou que não há expectativa de data para retomar as atividades. A Braskem opera oito unidades industriais no Rio Grande do Sul, que produzem 5 milhões de toneladas (t)/ano de petroquímicos básicos, polietileno e polipropileno, de acordo com seu website.

Related news posts

Argus illuminates the markets by putting a lens on the areas that matter most to you. The market news and commentary we publish reveals vital insights that enable you to make stronger, well-informed decisions. Explore a selection of news stories related to this one.

24/06/17

Porto Alegre, Brazil partially reopens post-flood

Porto Alegre, Brazil partially reopens post-flood

Sao Paulo, 17 June (Argus) — The Porto Alegre port, in Brazil's flood-hit southern Rio Grande do Sul state, partially resumed operations last week while other area ports continue to recover. Activities had been suspended at Porto Alegre since 2 May, following the unprecedented floods that hit the state in late April and May, but there was a partial reopening on 14 June. Porto Alegre is still carrying out cleaning and maintenance, and port authority Portos RS is still analyzing damage to infrastructure. The first operation will take place at the POA02 terminal, leased by logistic firm Serra Morena. The 60,456 dwt bulk carrier Nord Mississipi will be unloading inputs for fertilizer production. Porto Alegre is one of three ports in Rio Grande do Sul, along with Pelotas and Rio Grande. Pelotas was also hit by the floods but resumed operations on 21 May. The port of Rio Grande did not suspend operations but has had to reduce the draft of ships allowed in to port because of debris and sediment left by the flooding. The draft at the Bunge, Bianchini and Termasa/Tergrasa terminals was reduced to 12.8 meters (42ft) on 21 May and is now 11.9m. Rio Grande do Sul is once again on alert because of the forecast of new rains in the state over the next few days. By João Petrini Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Brazil steel market braces for CSN price increase


24/06/17
24/06/17

Brazil steel market braces for CSN price increase

Sao Paulo, 17 June (Argus) — Brazilian steelmaker CSN is expected to increase prices for some of its products weeks after the government announced new tariffs on imported steel. The company plans to raise prices for hot-rolled coil (HRC) by 7.5pc starting on 1 July and by 5pc to other products such as cold-rolled coil (CRC), three sources familiar with the matter told Argus, citing information from CSN to some of its clients. The move comes days after Brazil's government announced the rules for new tariffs on imported steel aimed at protecting domestic producers. CSN declined to comment. By Carolina Pulice Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Rains return to Brazil's Rio Grande do Sul state


24/06/17
24/06/17

Rains return to Brazil's Rio Grande do Sul state

Sao Paulo, 17 June (Argus) — Rainfall returned to Brazil's flood-hit Rio Grande do Sul state over the weekend and is likely to remain until Wednesday, according to meteorological firm Climatempo. Downpours started in late April brought havoc to the state, flooding rivers and lakes and hampering several logistics points. Several state and national highways are still damaged and the state's main airport is likely to remain closed until the end of the year. The weather had eased in the last few weeks, with lake and river levels dropping below flood levels since at least 9 June. But two new cold fronts brought rains to the state once again on 15 June, Climatempo said. Rains are likely to reach an accumulated 200-300mm (7.9-11.8in) from 15-19 June in the state's central-northern and northwestern regions, Climatempo said. Other areas will receive 80-150mm in the same span. Showers in the central-northern region of the state hit 50-60mm on 16 June alone, according to the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The Cai and Jacui rivers have reached above-flood levels once again, according to the state's civil defense. The Taquari River's levels are "above caution quotas," reaching 17m (55.7ft). Levels need to be below 5m to be considered normal. Civil defense authorities have also issued a flood warning for those that live close to the Sinos River, asking them to evacuate risky areas. Rio Grande do Sul is one of Brazil's main agricultural states. The US Department of Agriculture has cut the state's 2023-24 soybean production estimate because of the floods. The extreme weather has left at least 176 dead and over 422,000 people displaced, according to the civil defense's latest report published on 14 June. By Lucas Parolin Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Huge potential for tray-to-tray recycling:PETCORE


24/06/17
24/06/17

Huge potential for tray-to-tray recycling:PETCORE

London, 17 June (Argus) — Ahead of the Petcore Europe Thermoforms Conference in Granada, Spain, on 25-26 June, the technical manager of Petcore Europe's thermoforming working group, Jose-Antonio Alarcon, spoke to Argus about the development and challenges of tray-to-tray recycling in Europe. Why is closing the loop on tray-to-tray packaging important for the European industry? Most of the PET recycling industry has been concentrated on recycling PET bottles, while tray packaging makes up around 25pc of the overall PET market in Europe. For many years, bottle producers were not keen to use recycled content in their packaging, so most recycled PET flakes were going into tray applications. As regulation continues to push up recycled content in bottles, more and more flakes are going to the bottle market, while trays have not followed the same circularity path and recycled content supply has become more competitive. Around 70pc of bottles are collected on average in Europe, but the figure is less than 30pc for trays. Only around 50,000 t/yr of trays are currently recycled in Europe, when more than 1mn t/yr are placed on the market. There is huge potential. Petcore Europe has been pushing for tray-to-tray solutions, and in the thermoforming working group we are working on dealing with barriers to making trays circular, looking at collection, recycling technologies, standardisation and design for recycling, food contact and communication. What are the major obstacles to scaling up tray-to-tray recycling? One is the collection of trays in most countries in Europe. In some countries, such as Italy, trays are collected together with other packaging types. In others — particularly where there is a deposit return system (DRS) for bottles — then trays are not properly collected. Collection is the first challenge, if you are not collecting, you are not sorting, you are not recycling. One country that is very successful in tray collection is Belgium. France is working on it and is doing a good job. And Italy is also carrying out trials, but these have been less successful — finding an appropriate outlet for material was a challenge and improvements need to be made to make this work. It is worth mentioning that, Corepla, the EPR system in Italy, has several industrial schemes to improve tray-to-tray recycling with selected recyclers. But the success story in Belgium really stands out. It is a chicken and egg scenario, why is there not more tray-to-tray recycling? Because it is not collected, sorted, recycled? Or maybe because there is not enough demand? If there is not the demand for inclusion of tray flake, then sorters do not have the critical mass to create a dedicated stream. The technology is advancing, there are sorting technologies capable of identifying PET bottles, PET mono-layer tray, PET multi-trays and there are recyclers today that are leading the market and recycling both mono and multi-layer trays already. No fewer than seven stakeholders in the value chain need to be convinced that tray-to-tray is the right thing to do and makes sense — both environmentally and economically. How do you see tray-to-tray recycling developing in the coming years? Ultimately, the market will determine the value of tray-to-tray recycling. The recycling of trays needs to evolve. Bottle recycling has been in place for more than 20 years, and there is a clear progression from how it looked at the beginning to how the market works today. The tray recycling sector is in its infancy, and it will take time to evolve. It needs to have the right level of interest and demand to progress. At the end of the day if things are not economically viable, they will not progress. The market needs to be self-sustaining. Some companies are already focused on recycling of multi and mono-layer recycling. And there is a learning curve. If you look at the number of players recycling bottles in Europe and compare it with recyclers of trays, it is very different. But it is growing, and most tray-to-tray projects only started in recent years. There will be more solutions — sorting and washing technology will improve, decontamination technology will improve. We need separate sorting, and the value chain and retailers to be aligned and moving in the right direction. Progress is slow, but it is necessarily so for the learning curve. At the same time, we need to put pressure on the market to catalyse this movement. Legislation will play a critical role, but the best action is to drive your own fate. How is regulation supporting the development of tray circularity? There are particular chapters on trays in Packaging and Packaging Waste Regulation (PPWR) in EU regulation 2022/1616 and the Single Use Plastics Directive (SUPD), but there is no specific legislation dedicated to thermoforming packaging just yet. In the SUPD, there is mention of on-the-go packaging that can be related to trays, but it covers all packaging types for single use, not specifically PET trays. Article 6 under EU regulation 2022/1616 mentions the need for separate collection of plastic to be used in food contact applications. This is where we need to work more on the collection and sorting of PET trays and have to push for the trays to be placed in a separate collection stream. While legalisation undoubtedly underpins demand for recycled content, Petcore aims to go above and beyond the minimum requirements set for the tray market. The thermoforming market needs to be circular and needs to be self-reliant, independent of the regulation imposed. Will the development of chemical recycling be in competition with tray-to-tray recycling? The aim of the association is to make the whole PET market circular — my expectation is that in the future there will most probably be some bottle flake going into trays and some tray flake going into bottles. There will also be some claim for chemical recycling, but each sector needs to have its own area, we need to have mechanical and chemical recycling working in harmony. Recycling of trays is not the same as recycling bottles, mechanical properties and composition of the packaging is different. And trays are more complex than bottles, because they have the tray, lidding film, inks, labels, etc. The percentage of multi-layer material is much higher in trays than in bottles and this makes the recycling process more complex. And design for recycling will help, but there is a place for both mechanical and chemical recycling. We need to look for the most conservate and sustainable recycling route — first this is mechanical, but when this is not possibility chemical recycling makes sense. Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

US PVC export prices rise in early June


24/06/14
24/06/14

US PVC export prices rise in early June

Houston, 14 June (Argus) — Average prices for US polyvinyl chloride (PVC) exports have continued to rise in recent weeks, increasing by $50/metric tonne (t) in just the last two weeks as US exporters expand market share in key regions. Argus assessed export prices in the week ending 14 June between $820-850/t fas Houston. In addition to the reflect the recent price increase, this week's price range is $110/t higher than the start of May, when PVC prices first started to rise. That early May rise in prices coincided with the shutdown of Orbia's 690,000t/yr PVC plant in Altamira, Mexico. The plant has been down since 5 May due to water shortages from an ongoing drought in the region. There has been no public announcement on when operations will resume and there is no clear outlook on when the drought will end, but some market participants suspect it could last deep into the summer. At the same time, Asian producers continue to be challenged by rising freight rates and tight vessel availability, making their PVC offerings less competitive to key markets. In particular, US traders have said exports to Africa, India, and south Asia from northeast Asia have been decreasing. On 10 June, Korean PVC producer LG Chem sent out a letter to its customers informing them about delivery delays due to logistical challenges. In the letter, the company noted a steep rise in ocean freight costs because shipping lines are keeping vessel space significantly tight. The letter also told customers that they may need to help partially cover the added shipping costs by paying an additional $100/t for shipments to be delivered on time, as shipping companies were only agreeing to transport cargo that was covered by these higher upfront costs. US exporters have taken advantage of the supply gaps created from those two issues, and several traders in recent weeks have said buyers around the world would look to the US going forward to provide adequate supply. The result has meant that even with the increase in prices, US exporters have continued to gain traction in Africa and Asia, while shoring up market share in the Americas. While the operating rates in the US have improved, the industry as a whole is still not running at full rates. Domestic demand is still strong according to producers and buyers in the US, a dynamic which could keep export availability tighter in the weeks ahead. This has led some traders to expect further price increases for export volumes in the weeks ahead. By Aaron May and Tasani Stokes Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Business intelligence reports

Get concise, trustworthy and unbiased analysis of the latest trends and developments in oil and energy markets. These reports are specially created for decision makers who don’t have time to track markets day-by-day, minute-by-minute.

Learn more