Refinery repairs, imports ease Venezuelan gasoline gap

  • : Crude oil, Oil products
  • 21/02/01

Refinery repairs and the arrival of more Iranian gasoline have given Venezuela another breather from its chronic gasoline shortage.

State-owned PdV's 305,000 b/d Cardon refinery, the focus of its repair efforts, restarted gasoline and diesel production early yesterday after divers patched a ruptured crude supply pipeline that runs under Lake Maracaibo, according to three refinery officials.

Cardon currently is producing a combined 46,000 b/d of gasoline, including 22,000 b/d from its 86,000 b/d fluid catalytic cracker (FCC) and 24,000 b/d from its 54,000 b/d naphtha reformer.

Cardon's distillation unit 2 (CD-2) is processing just over 47,000 b/d of medium quality crude transported through the 143mi (230km) Ule pipeline that runs from mature fields on the east coast of the lake to the 940,000 b/d CRP refining complex on Paraguana.

The CRP complex, which PdV operates as an integrated facility, includes Cardon and the nearby 635,000 b/d Amuay refinery.

At Amuay, a single operational distillation unit integrated with a VGO unit is processing almost 65,300 b/d of medium quality crude.

Amuay's distillation unit 4 has been written off as a total loss after an October 2020 vapor blast inflicted catastrophic structural damage, according to a CRP manager.

The CRP is producing around 23,000 b/d of diesel overall. Together with 15,000 b/d of production at PdV's 190,000 b/d Puerto La Cruz refinery, the company is supplying up to 38,000 b/d of high-sulfur diesel.

Diesel supply has drawn extra scrutiny after the previous US administration banned crude-for-diesel swaps by non-US companies as part of its "maximum pressure" campaign against President Nicolas Maduro's government. The new US administration is considering reversing the ban as a humanitarian measure, potentially easing oil export bottlenecks and replenishing Venezuelan stocks of imported low-sulfur diesel.

The oil ministry estimates domestic gasoline demand at about 110,000 b/d. Diesel for transport and power generation, among other uses, is around 100,000 b/d.

The Maduro government has been rationing gasoline for more than a year as PdV struggles to repair and sustain a small part of its 1.3mn b/d refining system. Caracas blames US sanctions for the breakdowns. Critics point the finger at the government for years of neglect, corruption, labor flight and unsteady electricity supply.

Four PdV officials at the Jose and Guaraguao terminals in eastern Venezuela tell Argus that the Iran-flagged Faxon and Fortune arrived over the past week with over 400,000 bl of gasoline.

The tankers are among a handful that delivered gasoline and alkylate to Venezuela on two previous occasions last year, sparking an outcry from Washington. Caracas and Tehran are both targets of US sanctions.

In what has become a routine practice in Venezuela, the tankers have their transponders switched off.


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24/06/17

Iran rebukes G7 over nuclear warning: Update

Iran rebukes G7 over nuclear warning: Update

Adds quotes from IAEA director general Dubai, 17 June (Argus) — Iran's foreign ministry has called on the G7 to distance itself from "destructive policies of the past" after the group issued a statement condemning Tehran's recent nuclear programme escalation. "Unfortunately, some countries, driven by political motives and by resorting to baseless and unproven claims, attempt to continue their failed and ineffective policy of imposing and maintaining sanctions against the Iranian nation," the foreign ministry's spokesperson Nasser Kanaani said on 16 June. Kanaani advised the G7 "to learn from past experiences and distance itself from destructive past policies". His comments were in response to a joint statement from G7 leaders on 14 June warning Iran against advancing its nuclear enrichment programme. The leaders said they would be ready to enforce new measures if Tehran were to transfer ballistic missiles to Russia. The G7's reference to Iran comes on the heels of a new resolution passed by the board of governors of the UN's nuclear watchdog the IAEA . The resolution calls on Iran to step up co-operation and reverse its decision to restrict the agency access to nuclear facilities by de-designating inspectors. Kanaani said "any attempt to link the war in Ukraine to the bilateral co-operation between Iran and Russia is an act with only biased political goals", adding that some countries are "resorting to false claims to continue sanctions" against Iran. Tehran will continue its "constructive interaction and technical co-operation" with the IAEA, Kanaani said. But the agency's resolution is "politically biased", he said. Not an "anti-Iran" policy In an interview with the Russian daily newspaper Izvestia published today, IAEA director general Rafael Grossi refused claims of political bias. "We do co-operate with Iran. I don't deny this. This is important for inspection. My Iranian colleagues often say that Iran is the most inspected country in the world. Well, it is, and for good reason. But this is not enough," Grossi said, adding that the IAEA does not adhere to an "anti-Iran policy". Grossi also stressed the need for countries to return to diplomacy with Iran, while expressing concerns over the expansion of its nuclear programme. "Russia plays a very important role in this diplomacy, trying to keep the Iranian programme within a predictable and peaceful framework. But again, everything needs to be controlled," he said. The IAEA's new resolution and the reference to Iran in the G7 statement could be the start of a more concerted effort to raise pressure on Tehran over its nuclear programme. "What is happening right now is the process of accumulation of resolutions, so that when the day comes and the IAEA makes a referral to the UN Security Council, there will be enough resolutions to make a case for action at the security council level," a diplomatic source told Argus . Iran is enriching uranium to as high as 60pc purity. Near 90pc is considered to be weapons grade, according to the IAEA. By Bachar Halabi Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Japex takes control of Norway-focused upstream venture


24/06/17
24/06/17

Japex takes control of Norway-focused upstream venture

Tokyo, 17 June (Argus) — Japanese upstream firm Japex has acquired a majority stake in Longboat Japex from London-listed independent Longboat Energy to take full control of the Norwegian oil and gas joint venture. Japex spent $2.5mn to buy the 50.1pc stake, which will completed during July-September this year, Japex said. It bought a 49.9pc stake in Longboat Japex from Longboat Energy in May last year, with the UK firm last year looking to raise extra funds through asset sales, farm-down deals or issuing new equity. By Reina Maeda Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Iran rebukes G7 after warning over nuclear escalation


24/06/17
24/06/17

Iran rebukes G7 after warning over nuclear escalation

Dubai, 17 June (Argus) — Iran's foreign ministry has called on the G7 to distance itself from "destructive policies of the past" after the group issued a statement condemning Tehran's recent nuclear programme escalation. "Unfortunately, some countries, driven by political motives and by resorting to baseless and unproven claims, attempt to continue their failed and ineffective policy of imposing and maintaining sanctions against the Iranian nation," the foreign ministry's spokesperson Nasser Kanaani said on 16 June. Kanaani advised the G7 "to learn from past experiences and distance itself from destructive past policies". His comments were in response to a joint statement from G7 leaders on 14 June warning Iran against advancing its nuclear enrichment programme. The leaders said they would be ready to enforce new measures if Tehran were to transfer ballistic missiles to Russia. The G7's reference to Iran comes on the heels of a new resolution passed by the board of governors of the UN's nuclear watchdog the IAEA . The resolution calls on Iran to step up co-operation and reverse its decision to restrict the agency access to nuclear facilities by de-designating inspectors. Kanaani said "any attempt to link the war in Ukraine to the bilateral co-operation between Iran and Russia is an act with only biased political goals", adding that some countries are "resorting to false claims to continue sanctions" against Iran. Tehran will continue its "constructive interaction and technical co-operation" with the IAEA, Kanaani said. But the agency's resolution is "politically biased", he said. The IAEA's new resolution and the reference to Iran in the G7 statement could be the start of a more concerted effort to raise pressure on Tehran over its nuclear programme. "What is happening right now is the process of accumulation of resolutions, so that when the day comes and the IAEA makes a referral to the UN Security Council, there will be enough resolutions to make a case for action at the security council level," a diplomatic source told Argus . Iran is enriching uranium to as high as 60pc purity. Near 90pc is considered to be weapons grade, according to the IAEA. By Bachar Halabi Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Venezuela to require appointments at some gas stations


24/06/14
24/06/14

Venezuela to require appointments at some gas stations

Caracas, 14 June (Argus) — Venezuelan drivers will need to schedule appointments in order to purchase gasoline from retail outlets selling government subsidized fuel, oil minister Pedro Tellechea told Argus on Friday. The subsidized gasoline is still inexpensive, at 2¢/liter, and plentiful, Tellechea said, despite drivers often waiting in line for hours for the fuel. But under a plan to modernize the stations selling the subsidized gas with new pumps and flat screen monitors, an appointment system will soon be required for purchases. Venezuela raised gasoline prices to 50¢/liter in 2020, to what the government has called a "international price," but then set aside stations meant just for members of the ruling party and other groups, where they could buy gasoline for much less. Today about 60pc of the country's 1,800 retail gas stations sell at unsubsidized prices. Half of Venezuela's gas stations will be refurbished this year, with pumps that can fill up an SUV in 20 seconds, supply 700 vehicles a day, and accept all forms of payment, Tellechea told reporters at a model station in Altamira, east Caracas, on Friday. "There aren't in South America gas stations right now just like the ones you are seeing today," he said. "Drivers won't have to wait in line at subsidized stations, they will have their appointments programmed to the second." Tellechea said Venezuelans are now using 95,000 b/d of gasoline but he declined to say how much is being produced domestically. Tallecha said oil production was growing, reaching "above 950,000 b/d" on Friday, but that included about 40,000 b/d of condensates and natural gas liquids. By Carlos Camacho Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Q&A: Phillips 66 to balance fossil and renewable fuels


24/06/14
24/06/14

Q&A: Phillips 66 to balance fossil and renewable fuels

Houston, 14 June (Argus) — With Phillips 66's Rodeo, California, refinery expected to ramp up to over 50,000 b/d of renewable fuels production by the end of this quarter, all eyes are on the refiner for what is next. Zhanna Golodryga , executive vice president of emerging energy and sustainability for Phillips 66, talked to Argus at the refiner's Houston headquarters about how the company looks at investments, its focus on sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) production and why Texas might be the Silicon Valley of the energy transition. The conversation has been edited for clarity and length. When Rodeo reaches full capacity, it will represent about 3pc of your overall output. What will your fleet look like longer-term and what will be the renewables/petroleum split? Not all the refineries in our portfolio are created equal, and when we look at them what I call them is "lower-carbon energy hubs". Not low, lower, because it's going to be a combination of everything. We're looking at the assets we have in the portfolio and what we can do to help bring in lower carbon solutions and what can we build out. Our focus is going to continue to be SAF. We understand the limitations of feedstocks and we have a very strong commercial organization that is now working on providing feedstocks just for Rodeo. But we're also thinking about what we can do to bring in different feedstocks. Energy transition opportunities aren't going to replace our traditional fossil fuel refining. It's an "and", not an "or". You've highlighted a future focus on SAF. Does that mean a move away from renewable diesel (RD)? I think we have flexibility to do both and it will be market driven going forward. We have to look at demand but there is demand for SAF globally, not just in the US. Demand for gasoline is not as strong as demand for diesel and sustainable aviation fuel. That is what our focus is and then we want to diversify the feedstock. What is your outlook for RD? I think RD is here for quite some time. It's hard to predict what's going to happen by 2050 but I think we will have the demand. It's going to take a long time to electrify all future transportation. I think we have a much better opportunity for now to focus on what we're really good at. That's fuels, renewable fuels. You have faced activist investor pressure calling for Phillips 66 to focus on its core refining business. How do investors feel about the Rodeo conversion and your future plans? We have taken a pragmatic approach to the energy transition. We have criteria that we follow prior to taking any projects over the line, specifically the energy transition type projects. They must meet five key prerequisites: the right returns, the right technology that has been proven at scale, the right regulatory environment, preferably involve a partnership and be done at the right time. We have to prove with Rodeo that this is, as I call it, our license to continue to grow the business. This is our license to operate additional energy transition business. This one is going to be done extremely well. What are the policy tailwinds and headwinds to your renewables investments? When we look at our opportunities in our energy transition portfolio, we are building our economic model for them to produce the right returns without any incentives. That is our starting point. On the other hand, the IRA [US Inflation Reduction Act] has been a bipartisan initiative and we think it's going to stand for the greater good of the planet. We have to think globally, as we have the Humber refinery in the UK. It's interesting for us to see what's possible in the US with the IRA incentives, versus more of a stick in Europe. But the challenge for us is permitting and timing. We probably could have brought Rodeo online sooner if we didn't have to wait for some permits. Our headquarters are in Texas and Texas is the "energy transition Silicon Valley". I'm repeating someone's words and those are the words of Bill Gates. But I believe that. We're perfectly positioned on the Gulf coast to go to the next phase and build something here. You've mentioned Phillips 66's 265,000 b/d Sweeny refinery in Old Ocean, Texas, as a low carbon energy hub. Does that mean it is a candidate for renewable fuel conversion or co-processing? It could be an option, maybe not at Sweeny, but in the Gulf coast, maybe Lake Charles. It's driven by our hardware, just like what we've done at Rodeo. By Nathan Risser Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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