Хабаровский НПЗ повысит глубину переработку нефти

  • : Hydrogen, Oil products
  • 23/01/25

Независимая нефтегазовая компания (ННК) собирается построить на Хабаровском НПЗ (мощность - 5 млн т/год) установку гидроочистки вакуумного газойля (ВГО) и установку по производству водорода, с целью углубления переработки нефти.

Ввод в строй блока гидроочистки ВГО позволит Хабаровскому НПЗ повысить выпуск компонентов автомобильного бензина и дизельного топлива. Процесс гидроочистки, который происходит с использованием молекул водорода, направлен на удаление из нефтяных фракций различных примесей, в том числе соединений серы и азота.

Правительство Хабаровского края сообщило в среду, что работы по строительству на НПЗ установок гидроочистки ВГО и производства водорода пройдут в текущем году, но не раскрыло предполагаемый срок ввода этих объектов в строй. Стоимость проекта оценивается в 41 млрд руб.

По данным участников рынка, в апреле-мае на Хабаровском НПЗ запланирован капитальный ремонт оборудования, в рамках которого будут остановлены оба блока первичной переработки нефти, а также установки гидрокрекинга, гидроочистки дизтоплива и каталитического риформинга.

Хабаровский НПЗ в 2022 г. работал с полной загрузкой - объем переработки сырья превысил 5 млн т, сообщили в региональном правительстве. В 2021 г. завод переработал 4,6 млн т нефти.

ННК рассматривает возможность увеличения мощности Хабаровского НПЗ до 10-15 млн т/год.


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24/05/24

Hydrogen industry looks on the bright side

Hydrogen industry looks on the bright side

A tough year for clean hydrogen prospects is giving way to more optimism on projects and demand, writes Pamela Machado London, 24 May (Argus) — The clean hydrogen sector still lacks tangible progress and final investment decisions (FIDs) for projects remain few and far between, but it is reaching a moment of reckoning essential for market maturity, delegates at the World Hydrogen Summit in Rotterdam said this month. When asked whether they were more or less positive than a year ago, industry participants gave diverging answers, but there was widespread agreement that progress on clean hydrogen has been slower than expected in what one called "the year of doldrums". Increasing material and financing costs, the unstable geopolitical situation and a lack of clarity on regulatory frameworks are just some of the challenges developers have faced. This is a "grim environment if you were expecting the Swiss army knife approach" to work, industry body the Australia Hydrogen Council chief executive Fiona Simon said, alluding to the misguided expectation that hydrogen could be used across all sectors to help decarbonise. "We are coming to terms" with the real use and appropriate applications of hydrogen, Simon said, pointing to green steel production. "We are converging on the same concepts and same policies." The industry has reached the point where it is becoming a lot clearer which projects will actually materialise. A greater sense of realism is underpinning discussions, according to Dutch gas company Gasunie chief executive Willemien Terpstra. But delegates widely urged more policy action, especially on the demand side. Spurring on demand will be key to getting to more FIDs, Spanish utility Iberdrola's hydrogen development director, Jorge Palomar Herrero, said. "We can have great intentions and great projects but without the demand they are not going to happen." Even in Europe, which has pushed ahead with efforts to stimulate demand, these have not been enough to spur offtake, Herrero said. Demand-side incentives alone will likely not be enough and eventually there will have to be consumption obligations too, some said. "Carrots" may help to reduce project costs and kick-start production, but "sticks" will be key, delegates heard. Consumption mandates could accelerate momentum in emerging markets that have big ambitions for exports to future demand centres, World Bank private-sector arm IFC energy chief investment officer Ignacio de Calonje said. Governments are now ready to act on these requests, according to Brussels-based industry body the Hydrogen Council's director for policy and partnerships, Daria Nochevnik. "The penny has dropped," Nochevnik told Argus , noting that the need for demand-side action was the number one priority outcome of a ministerial-executive roundtable held in Rotterdam this month. Seeing red, feeling blue But governments must also remove red tape to speed things up, delegates said. European developers in particular are increasingly frustrated with the paperwork involved in funding applications, German utility Uniper vice-president for hydrogen business development Christian Stuckmann said. Shortening lengthy permitting and funding processes is high on governments' lists, Nochevnik noted. Some delegates renewed calls for a wider acceptance of "blue" hydrogen — made from natural gas with carbon capture and storage — to address concerns that, if it is up to renewable hydrogen alone, things will start too late or not at all. There appeared to be widespread consensus that blue hydrogen will have a key role to play, especially in a transitional period, as it can already deliver significant emissions reductions. But there is a "stigma" in Europe, industrial gas firm Linde vice-president for clean energy David Burns said. This could hamper its adoption, which many delegates argued the world cannot afford. Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Dangote refinery to export 10ppm diesel in June


24/05/24
24/05/24

Dangote refinery to export 10ppm diesel in June

London, 24 May (Argus) — Nigeria's 650,000 b/d Dangote refinery will start exporting diesel conforming to European specifications along with gasoline sales in June, its vice president for oil and gas Devakumar Edwin has said. "We expect before the end of next month we'll also have gasoline in the market, and we'll also have Euro V diesel for export, that is below 10ppm", Edwin said this week at a Society of Petroleum Engineers event in Lagos. Dangote chief executive Aliko Dangote reiterated the planned June start for gasoline on 17 May. Dangote started its crude distillation unit in January, and received approval to start up a mild hydrocracker with its desulphurisation units in March. A source at Nigeria's downstream regulator NMDPRA said the refinery has now received approval to start its residual fluid catalytic cracker. Dangote started naphtha exports in March, low-sulphur straight run fuel oil (LSSR) exports in May and began selling diesel and jet fuel domestically in April. It has a waiver from NMDPRA to sell diesel with sulphur levels above 600ppm into the local market. At full capacity Dangote will be able to more than meet Nigerian domestic gasoline demand. But a trader in the region said gasoline production is unlikely to start next month, citing the amount of cargoes to be delivered to the country. Exports of naphtha, a key blending component in finished-grade gasoline, are continuing from the refinery, with 80,000t due to load on 31 May according to Kpler. And Edwin hinted at a slowing of spot sales. "We had a meeting to see, probably, how we can slow down our sales because we've already made quite a few forward bookings," he said this week. "Export, for example, aviation/jet, the last vessel went to the Caribbean islands. The next vessel, we are booking for US market." Dangote recently added TotalEnergies as a buyer in a deal that could see the French company take refined products for its African network of 4,800 retail fuel stations, including more than 540 in Nigeria. The deal could also see the oil major supply crude to the refinery. A source told Argus there is a deal for TotalEnergies to supply two crude cargoes each month, or around 2mn bl. Indications based on the refinery's slate to date and TotalEnergies' Nigerian crude equity suggest one cargo of the very light Amenam blend one of Bonny Light. By Adebiyi Olusolape and George Maher-Bonnett Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Q&A: Shell Oman to balance upstream with renewables


24/05/24
24/05/24

Q&A: Shell Oman to balance upstream with renewables

Dubai, 24 May (Argus) — Shell has been in Oman for decades now and had a front row seat to its energy evolution from primarily an oil producing nation to now a very gas-rich and gas-leaning hydrocarbons producer. Argus spoke to Shell Oman's country chairman Walid Hadi about the company's energy strategy in the sultanate. Edited highlights follow: How would you characterize Oman's energy sector today, and where do new energies fit into that? Oman is one of the countries where there is quite a bit of overlap between how we see the energy transition and how the country sees it. Oman is clear that hydrocarbons will continue to play a role in its energy system for a long period of time. But it is also looking to decrease the carbon intensity to the most extent which is viable. We need to work on creating new energy systems or new components of energy system like hydrogen and EV charging to facilitate that. It is what we would like to call a 'just transition' because you think about it from macroeconomic perspective of the country and its economic health. Shell is involved across the energy spectrum in Oman – from upstream gas to alternative, clean energies. What is Shell's overall strategy for the country? In Oman, our strategic foundation has three main pillars. The first is around oil and liquids and our ambition is to sustain oil and liquids production. At the same time, we aim to significantly reduce carbon intensity from the oil production coming from PDO. The second strategic pillar is gas, and our ambition here is to grow the amount of gas we are producing in Oman and also to help Oman grow its LNG export capabilities. The more committed we are in unlocking the gas reserves in the country, the more we can support Oman's growth, diversification, and the resilience of its economy through investments and LNG revenue. Gas also offers a very logical and nice link into blue and green hydrogen, whether in sequence or as a stepping stone to scale the hydrogen economy in the country. The last strategic pillar is to establish low-carbon value chains, predominantly centered around hydrogen, more likely blue hydrogen in the short term and very likely material green in the long term, which is subject to regulations and markets developing. How would you view Oman's potential to be a major exporter of green hydrogen? When examining the foundational aspects of green hydrogen manufacturing, such as the quality of solar and wind resources and their onshore complementarity, Oman emerges as a highly competitive country in terms of its capabilities. But where we are in technology and where we are in global markets and on policy frameworks — the demand centers for green hydrogen are maturing but not yet matured. I think there will be a period of discovery for green hydrogen globally, not just for Oman, in the way LNG started 20-30 years ago. When it does, Oman will be well-positioned to play global role in the global hydrogen economy. But the question is, how much time it is going to take us and what kind of multi-collaboration needs to be in place to enable that? The realisation of this potential hinges on several factors: the policies of the Omani government, its bilateral ties with Japan, Korea, and the EU, and the technological advancements within the industry. Shell has also been looking at developing CCUS opportunities in the country. How big a role can CCUS play in the region's energy transition? CCUS is going to be an important tool in decarbonising the global energy system. We have several projects globally that we are pursuing for own scope 1, scope 2 emissions reductions, as well as to enable scope 3 emissions with the customers and partners In Oman, we are pursuing a blue hydrogen project where CCUS is a clear component. This initiative serves as a demonstrative case, helping us gauge the country's potential for CCUS implementation. We are using that as a proof point to understand the potential for CCUS in the country. At this stage, it's too early to gauge the scale of CCUS adoption in Oman or our specific role within it. However, we are among the pioneers in establishing the initial proof point through our Blue Hydrogen initiative. You were able to kick off production in block 10 in just over a year after signing the agreement. How are things progressing there? We have started producing at the plateau levels that we agreed with the government, which is just above 500mn ft³/d. Block 10 gas is sold to the government, through the government-owned Integrated Gas Company (IGC), which so far has been the entity that purchases gas from various operators in Oman like us, Shell. IGC then allocates that gas on a certain policy and value criteria across different sectors. We will require new gas if we are going to expand LNG in Oman. There is active gas exploration happening there in Block 10. We know there is more potential in the block. We still don't know at what scale it can be produce gas or the reservoir's characteristics. But blocks 10 and 11 are a combination of undiscovered and discovered resources. We are aiming to significantly increase gas production through a substantial boost. However, the exact scale and timing of this expansion will only be discernible upon the conclusion of our two-year exploration campaign in the block. We expect to understand the full growth potential by around mid to late 2025. Do you have any updates on block 11? Has exploration work there begun? We did have a material gas discovery which is being appraised this year, but it is a bit too early to draw conclusions at this stage. So, after the appraisal campaign is completed, we will be able to talk more confidently about the production potential. Exploration is a very uncertain business. You must go after a lot of things and only a few will end up working. We have a very aggressive exploration campaign at the moment. We also expect by the end of 2025, we would be in a much better position to determine the next wave of growth and where it is going to come from. Shell is set to become the largest off taker from Oman LNG, how do you view the LNG markets this year and next? As a company, we are convinced, that the demand for LNG will grow and it needs to grow if the world is going to achieve the energy transition Gas must play a role, it has to play a bigger role globally over the time, mainly to replace coal in power generation and given its higher efficiency and lower carbon intensity fuel in the energy mix. While Oman may not be the largest LNG exporter globally or hold the most significant gas reserves, it is a niche player in the gas sector with a sophisticated and high-quality gas infrastructure. Oman's resource base remains robust, driving ongoing exploration and investment efforts. This growth trajectory includes catering to domestic needs and servicing industrial hubs like Duqm and Sohar, alongside allocating resources for export purpose. We have the ambition to grow gas for domestic purpose and for gas for eventual exports Have you identified any international markets to export LNG? We have been historically and predominantly focused on east and we continue to see east as core LNG market with focus on Japan, Korea, and China. Europe has also emerged on the back of the Ukraine-Russia crisis as growing demand center for LNG. Over time we might focus on different markets to a certain extent. It will be driven on maximising value for the country. By Rithika Krishna Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Richmond City Council proposes Chevron refinery tax


24/05/23
24/05/23

Richmond City Council proposes Chevron refinery tax

Houston, 23 May (Argus) — The Richmond City Council in California's Bay Area has paved the way for a tax on Chevron's 245,000 b/d refinery, voting unanimously at a 21 May meeting for the city's attorney to prepare a ballot initiative. The newly proposed excise tax would be based on the Richmond refinery's feedstock throughputs, according to a presentation given by Communities for a Better Environment (CBE) at the meeting. It is a "…legally defensible strategy to generate new revenue for the city," CBE attorney Kerry Guerin said. The city has previously looked to tax the refinery, with voters passing ‘Measure T' in 2008 before it was struck down in court in 2009. This led to a 15-year settlement agreement freezing any new taxes on Chevron's refinery, but the agreement expires on 30 June 2025. The city is projecting a $34mn budget shortfall for the 2024 to 2025 fiscal year and is seeking to shore up its finances with additional revenue. Ballot initiatives allow Californian citizens to bring laws to a vote without the support of the state's governor or legislature, and the tax proposal could go to voters as early as November this year, according to CBE's Guerin. "Richmond has been the refinery town for more than 100 years, but it won't be 100 years from now," Richmond Mayor Eduardo Martinez said during the meeting. Chevron reiterates risk to renewables A tax on the refinery is the "wrong approach to encourage investment in our facility and in the city that could lead to new energy solutions and reductions in emissions from the refinery," Chevron senior public affairs representative Brian Hubinger said during the meeting's public comments. Hubinger's comment echoes prior warnings from Chevron that a potential cap on California refining profit in the process of being implemented by the California Energy Commission (CEC) would make the company less willing to investment in renewable energy . "An additional punitive tax burden reduces our ability to make investments in our facility to provide the affordable, reliable and ever-cleaner energy our community depends on every day, along with the job opportunities and emission reductions that go with these investments," Chevron said in an emailed statement. The Richmond refinery tax is a "hasty proposal, brought forward by activist interests," the company said. The company last year finished converting a hydrotreating unit at its 269,000 b/d El Segundo, California, refinery to process both renewable and crude feedstocks. The facility was processing 2,000 b/d of bio feedstock to produce renewable diesel (RD) and sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) and said it expected to up production to 10,000 b/d last year. But Chevron has so far lagged its California refining peers in terms of RD volumes with Marathon's Martinez plant running at about 24,000 b/d in the first quarter — half of its nameplate capacity — and Phillips 66's Rodeo refinery producing 30,000 b/d with plans to up runs to over 50,000 b/d by the end of the second quarter . Chevron did not immediately respond to a request for current RD volumes at its California refineries. By Nathan Risser Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Günstiger Frei-Haus Diesel wirft Fragen auf


24/05/23
24/05/23

Günstiger Frei-Haus Diesel wirft Fragen auf

Hamburg, 23 May (Argus) — Im Osten und Süden Deutschlands bieten mehrere Unternehmen mindestens seit Ende 2023 Diesel zur Lieferung frei Haus teils mehrere Euro pro 100l unter den Preisen ab Lager oder Raffinerie an. Händler berichten von Umsatzeinbußen. Marktteilnehmer in den entsprechenden Regionen im Osten und Nordbayern suchen nach einer Erklärung für diese großen Preisdifferenzen. Sie berichten von Diesellieferungen frei Haus, deren Preis 4,00 €/100l bis 6,00 €/100l unter den Inlandspreisnotierungen und damit weit unter ihren Einkaufspreisen liegt. Entsprechend könnten sie preislich nicht mithalten. Händler und Großhändler haben deswegen Kunden in geschäftsrelevanten Größenordnungen verloren. Inverkehrbringer von Diesel schätzen, dass täglich etwa zwischen 600 und 1000 m³ von den Niedrigpreisanbietern umgesetzt werden. Weiter geben Marktteilnehmer an, es seien diverse Zollämter auf diese Preisdiskrepanz aufmerksam gemacht und um Überprüfung gebeten worden, ein Ergebnis stehe jedoch noch aus. Die Generalzolldirektion teilte auf Anfrage von Argus mit, zu etwaigen laufenden Ermittlungen keine Auskunft geben zu können. Die Firmen, die Diesel so günstig anbieten, sind erst seit kurzer Zeit aktiv beziehungsweise waren zuvor nicht im Mineralölmarkt tätig. Gegenüber Argus haben zwei der besagten Anbieter bestätigt, dass sie Diesel unter Inlandspreisniveau verkaufen, gaben jedoch keine Auskunft darüber, wer exakt die Ware nach Deutschland importiert und diese in Verkehr bringt, also für das Aufkommen von Energiesteuer, EBV-Beitrag, CO2-Abgabe und THG-Kosten verantwortlich ist. Es handele sich um ganz normale Trading-Geschäfte. Eines der anbietenden Unternehmen teilte mit, dass Diesel mit einem Abschlag von 4,00 bis 5,00 €/100l auf Inlandspreisbasis verkauft würde. Hierbei handele es sich jedoch um große Mengen von mindestens zehn kompletten Tankzügen in der Woche. Bei kleineren Mengen wäre der Abschlag geringer. Die Ware würde im großen Umfang von mehreren Unternehmen in Rostock oder im Raum Amsterdam-Rotterdam-Antwerpen zusammen zugekauft und dann an mehrere Lagerhäuser verteilt. Dabei hat die Firma auf Nachfrage nicht angegeben, ob es sich bei den Lagerhäusern um Tanklager handele. Lagerraum würde individuell verwendet werden. Die Auslieferung an den Kunden erfolge per eigenem Spediteur. Ein anderer Anbieter ist nach eigener Aussage nur als Zwischenhändler tätig, und das seit etwa einem Jahr. Sein Vorlieferant kaufe Handelskontingente in Polen, Tschechien und auch Deutschland zu, um diese dann in Deutschland günstig auf den Markt bringen. Die Ware würde allen deutschen Vorgaben entsprechen. Von Gabriele Zindel Senden Sie Kommentare und fordern Sie weitere Informationen an feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

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