Raízen e BYD anunciam hubs de recarga de elétricos

  • : Battery materials, Biofuels, Electricity, Metals
  • 24/02/02

A Raízen Power – braço de energia elétrica da sucroalcooleira Raízen – e a montadora chinesa BYD fecharam parceria para construir polos de recarga de veículos elétricos pelo Brasil.

A iniciativa criará centros para recarga de veículos elétricos com a solução Shell Recharge em oito capitais, utilizando energia de fonte renovável fornecida pela Raízen Power.

Cerca de 600 novos pontos de carregamento serão instalados, adicionando 18 megawatts (MW) de potência instalada para recarga no país, disse a Raízen – uma joint venture entre a Shell e o conglomerado Cosan.

O anúncio segue o início da construção do primeiro complexo industrial da BYD no Brasil, que produzirá 150.000 carros/ano na Bahia, com operações programadas para começar em dezembro.

"Vemos o continente como um mercado potencial para a BYD e a transição energética", contou Alexandre Baldy, conselheiro especial da empresa e ex-ministro das Cidades do governo Temer, à Argus.

A Associação Nacional dos Fabricantes de Veículos Automotores (Anfavea) projeta que as vendas de veículos elétricos movidos a bateria aumentem para 24.100 unidades em 2024, ante 15.200 no ano passado. A entidade prevê a alta mesmo considerando a volta da tarifa de importação em janeiro.


Related news posts

Argus illuminates the markets by putting a lens on the areas that matter most to you. The market news and commentary we publish reveals vital insights that enable you to make stronger, well-informed decisions. Explore a selection of news stories related to this one.

24/06/20

Australia’s MinRes to close Yilgarn iron ore hub

Australia’s MinRes to close Yilgarn iron ore hub

Sydney, 20 June (Argus) — West Australian (WA) iron ore mining firm Mineral Resources (MinRes) will stop shipping from its lower grade Yilgarn operations by 31 December and transfer staff to its Onslow project in the Pilbara. The 8mn t/yr Yilgarn in the Mid West region of WA is not financially viable beyond the end of 2024, according to MinRes. The mine operated at a delivered cost of A$139/wet metric tonne (wmt) ($93/wmt) and received revenue of A$164/wmt during July-December 2023 . The Argus ICX 62pc Fe iron ore price averaged $117.45/dry metric tonne (dmt) cfr Qingdao January-June this year compared with $121.47/dmt for July-December 2023. It was last assessed at $107.10/dmt on 19 June. As prices have fallen for MinRes, costs are also rising, particularly at the ageing Yilgarn operations, which it bought six years ago after its previous owners US firm Cleveland Cliffs closed it in 2018. The WA government helped MinRes to restart the Koolyanobbing mine as the foundation of the Yilgarn operations in early 2019 . The Argus ICX price was $72.80/dmt cfr Qingdao on 31 December 2018 and rose to a peak of over $200/dmt in mid-2021 before easing to its current levels. MinRes will move staff and equipment from Yilgarn to its new 35mn t/yr Onslow, which shipped its first ore to Chinese producer Baowu Steel in May . By Jo Clarke Iron ore prices ($/dmt) Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Buyers, ex-EU mills discussing HRC quota management


24/06/19
24/06/19

Buyers, ex-EU mills discussing HRC quota management

London, 19 June (Argus) — Buyers and exporters to the EU are trying to reduce the risk of purchasing "other countries" hot-rolled coil (HRC) under the 15pc single country quota cap. They are discussing adding duty-sharing clauses to contracts, and commitments from sellers to not exceed their quotas. Mills from the same countries, in the meantime, are deciding whether it would benefit them to allocate the quarterly quota between themselves, in a similar way to South Korean producers, or adopt India's approach, where each seller has tried to maximise its market share. Participants are preparing for a turbulent lead-up to and start of July, and trying to estimate how much duty will be payable on imports mainly from Japan and Vietnam, but also Egypt and Taiwan. Sources expect that October arrivals could also be above quota allocations. In order for purchasing to resume, amid all the uncertainty, buyers are demanding that sellers provide some guarantees that they would not sell excessively in the EU. But feedback from mills has so far been mixed — Vietnamese sellers have said they cannot be held responsible if exports to the EU are higher than the roughly 142,000 t/quarter allowed duty-free, and they were not willing to share duties with buyers, according to participants. Some buyers said they have enquired with Egypt about committing their full quota to them with a firm bid. But controlling Egypt's quota may be more complicated, as often the mill sells on a fob basis to traders, which may in turn sell to Europe or not, market participants said. Some sources said the producer is allocating volumes per buyer depending on the relationship and historical tonnages purchased. Co-operation between Taiwanese mills could be more straightforward, as export certificates are issued by the Taiwanese steel association, according to a seller, in which case volumes can be tracked and monitored more easily. One source said mills will look to sell higher grades and specialties in lieu of commodity HRC to compensate for the reduction in volume to the EU, but maximise the revenue generated. In Japan, mills have been discussing sharing the allocation between themselves, but each seller is reportedly pushing for a larger portion of the quota, even those that have sold very low historical amounts to the EU previously, placing the most active mill under further pressure. There have been suggestions that Japan could try to ramp up its exports of other products to compensate for the loss in HRC — it is often already the lowest-priced supplier of cold-rolled coil (CRC). Buyers and traders are continuing to urge the EU to allow for a grace period in the meantime, so that the material due to be cleared on 1 July is subject to the old regulations. But it appears that the European Commission, which has not yet officially confirmed that the safeguards have been passed as proposed, is not going to take those requests into account. Sources in Brussels suggest that no grace period has been included in the regulation. By Lora Stoyanova Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Australian opposition releases nuclear power plan


24/06/19
24/06/19

Australian opposition releases nuclear power plan

Sydney, 19 June (Argus) — Australia's main political opposition today laid out its nuclear energy plan. It aims to bring the first government-owned reactors on line as early as 2035-37 if it is elected next year. The Liberal-National coalition announced seven locations where small modular reactors (SMRs) or large-scale units could be installed, all in sites hosting coal-fired power facilities that have either closed or are scheduled to close, and each of them would have cooling water capacity and transmission infrastructure. A SMR could start generating electricity by 2035, while a larger plant could come on line by 2037, according to the coalition. "The Australian government will own these assets, but form partnerships with experienced nuclear companies to build and operate them," the opposition's leader Peter Dutton, spokesman for climate change and energy Ted O'Brien and National party leader David Littleproud said in a joint statement on 19 June. The opposition claims the federal Labor government's "renewables-only approach" is expensive and is "failing", while its target of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 43pc by 2030 has become "unachievable". The coalition earlier this month said it would not pursue the target, although it declined to set its own 2030 goal for GHG emissions cuts . Federal energy minister Chris Bowen said the coalition's plan lacked detail, costs or modelling, although the opposition has vowed to engage with local communities while site studies, including detailed technical and economic assessments, take place. The proposed sites are the Liddell and Mount Piper plants in New South Wales; the Tarong and Callide stations in Queensland; the Loy Yang facility in Victoria; the Northern Power station in South Australia; and the Muja plant in Western Australia. Nuclear power generation is prohibited in Australia under federal and state laws, and the Labor government last year ruled out legalising it because of its high costs. The Australian federal government estimates that replacing Australia's coal-fired plants with nuclear would cost A$387bn ($257bn) . The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) late last year said SMRs would not have "any major role" in emission cuts needed in the electricity sector for the country to reach its net zero GHG emissions target by 2050, as costs would be well above those for onshore wind and solar photovoltaic (PV). Nuclear plants would also take 15 years or more to be deployed because of lengthy periods for certification, planning and construction, CSIRO noted. CSIRO last month included large-scale nuclear costs for the first time in its annual GenCost report, saying costs would be lower than those for SMRs but still way above renewables. Estimated costs between A$136-226/MWh could be reached by 2040, compared with A$171-366/MWh for SMRs and A$144-239/MWh for coal-fired power with carbon capture and storage (CCS), but only if Australia committed to a "continuous nuclear building programme", requiring an initial investment in a higher cost unit. "If a decision to pursue nuclear in Australia were made in 2025, with political support for the required legislative changes, then the first full operation would be no sooner than 2040," CSIRO noted. By Juan Weik Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Phillips 66 targets high Rodeo runs


24/06/18
24/06/18

Phillips 66 targets high Rodeo runs

Houston, 18 June (Argus) — Low-carbon feedstock and sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) opportunities will support strong run rates from Phillips 66's converted renewables plant in Rodeo, California, this year, chief executive Mark Lashier said today. The outlook heralded a high output from the converted Rodeo refinery ramping up toward 50,000 b/d of renewable diesel capacity by the end of this month, despite historic lows in state and federal incentives for the fuel. "Where we are today, economically, yes, the credits are kind of compressed, but feedstocks are lower than we anticipated as well," Lashier told the JP Morgan Energy, Power & Renewables conference. "We still see good economic incentives to run and run full." The US independent refiner had started up pre-treatment units at the plant to begin processing lower-carbon feedstocks for renewable diesel in July and August, he said, consistent with previous guidance. "That's how you really make money in these assets — you get the lowest-carbon intensity feedstocks at the best value and process them through the hydrocrackers," Lashier said. " The facility would also bring online 10,000 b/d of renewable jet fuel blendstock production supporting 20,000 b/d of blended sustainable aviation fuel, a product Phillips 66 had not targeted in the initial concept for the site, he said. Both state and federal incentives to supply renewable diesel along the west coast have fallen as the fuel inundates those markets. Renewable diesel alone made up roughly 57pc of California's liquid diesel pool and generated 40pc of the Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) credits in the state's market-based transportation fuel carbon reduction program by the end of last year. The supply of lower-carbon fuels, led by renewable diesel, to the west coast LCFS markets have outstripped demand for deficit-generating petroleum fuels and led to growing reserves of available credits for compliance. California amassed more than 23mn metric tonnes of credits by the end of last year — more than enough left over after satisfying all of the new deficits generated last year to offset them a second time. The volume of unused credits has sent their price tumbling to nine-year lows. Oregon and Washington credits, which are needed for similar but distinct programs in those states, have similarly dropped as renewable diesel supplies spread out along the west coast. Gasoline consumption generates almost all new deficits in California. Year-over-year demand for the fuel nationwide has fallen below expectations this spring, Lashier said. "We are not really seeing things pick up like a lot of us expected to," he said. Lower-income customers struggling with higher costs on everything they buy may have forgone vacations, he said. The drop in broader buying power meanwhile had rippled through diesel consumption, he said. "As we move towards more expensive energy sources, that's the part of the economy that gets squeezed as well," Lashier said. "Hopefully we move through that and reverse and that part of the economy can pick up as well as the higher end of the economy." By Elliott Blackburn Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Amtrak used 1.2mn USG renewable diesel in 2023


24/06/18
24/06/18

Amtrak used 1.2mn USG renewable diesel in 2023

New York, 18 June (Argus) — US passenger rail service Amtrak used 1.2mn USG of renewable diesel in fiscal year 2023, up from zero the prior year, as the company balances near-term climate targets with goals to increase ridership. Amtrak started using renewable diesel on its Capitol Corridor, San Joaquin, and Pacific Surfliner intercity passenger lines in California during the fiscal year that ended September 2023. Renewable diesel accounted for about 2pc of the company's diesel use over that period, according to a sustainability report Amtrak released this week. The rail service's petroleum diesel use rose by about 6pc year-over-year, reflecting increases in ridership as travel recovers from the coronavirus pandemic. Scope 1 emissions, which come from Amtrak's direct operations and which mostly include burning diesel fuel, were up by more than 3pc from fiscal year 2022. While Amtrak's highly traveled Northeast Corridor is electrified, most of its lines rely on diesel-fueled locomotives. The company plans to replace diesel-powered engines over the long term but says it expects to use renewable diesel as a stopgap solution in the short term and is aiming for the biofuel to become its "main fuel source" for its diesel-powered engines. While the 2022 sustainability report made passing reference to biodiesel — a separate biofuel that can be blended at smaller volumes with petroleum diesel than renewable diesel — the 2023 report only mentions efforts to scale up use of renewable diesel. Amtrak has a goal of curbing greenhouse gas emissions by 40pc from a 2010 baseline by 2030 and achieving net-zero emissions by 2045. Most renewable diesel in the US is consumed in California, which has a low-carbon fuel standard that incentivizes the use of lower-carbon fuels. By Cole Martin Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Business intelligence reports

Get concise, trustworthy and unbiased analysis of the latest trends and developments in oil and energy markets. These reports are specially created for decision makers who don’t have time to track markets day-by-day, minute-by-minute.

Learn more