Indonesia plans 15mn electric vehicles on roads by 2030

  • : Battery materials, Emissions, Metals
  • 24/05/24

The Indonesian government aims to have 2mn four-wheeled electric vehicles (EVs) and 13mn two-wheeled EVs on its roads by 2030, to cut emissions and save energy.

This will bring about energy savings of 29.79mn bl of oil equivalent (boe) and cut exhaust emissions by 7.23mn t of CO2 in 2030, according to special staff to the minister of energy and mineral resources (ESDM) Agus Tjahjana.

Indonesia's transport sector makes up around a third of the country's energy consumption and the 11mn cars on Indonesian roads produce more than 35mn t/yr of CO2, while trucks emit more than 50mn t/yr, according to ESDM secretary general Dadan Kusdiana.

The country's vehicle fleet is likely to grow in coming years because of its economic development, so decarbonising the transport sector is critical to achieving net zero emissions by 2060, said the ESDM. Greater electrification of transport will also allow Indonesia to reduce its fossil fuel imports.

Indonesia is keen to develop the EV battery supply chain from upstream to downstream, in view of its large nickel resources that can support the development of the industry, said Agus. Indonesia currently has nine facilities processing nickel ore into nickel and cobalt sulphate, which is one of the materials used in making EV batteries. Out of these, four are already operational while three are in the construction stage, and the remaining two are still undergoing feasibility studies.

The next step is to promote the manufacture of battery precursors, cathodes, battery cells and batteries, considering that the electric charging and battery recycling industries already exist, said Agus.

But there is still a large price gap between EVs and conventional vehicles, said Dadan. The Indonesian government is hence providing tax incentives and subsidies for electric cars, hybrid cars and electric motorbikes to cover this gap.

"Indonesia has prepared $455mn to subsidise the sale of electric motorbikes," said Dadan, adding that the subsidy covers the sale of 800,000 new electric motorbikes and the conversion of 200,000 combustion engine motorbikes.

The government estimates that 32,000 charging stations will be needed to meet demand by 2030. The total number of charging stations available was 1,566 as of April, said Agus, adding that the government aims to add up to 48,118 charging stations by 2030.

The ESDM has just approved 204 nickel mining work plans for exploration and production. The country produced 175.6mn t of nickel ore output in 2023.


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24/06/14

Inpex invests in Australian solar, battery project

Inpex invests in Australian solar, battery project

Tokyo, 14 June (Argus) — Japanese upstream firm Inpex has decided to invest in a hybrid solar and battery project in the Australian state of New South Wales, aiming to boost its renewable energy business abroad. Inpex reached a final investment decision on the Quorn Park Hybrid project in Australia, a joint venture project with Italian utility Enel's wholly-owned Australian renewable energy firm Enel Green Power Australia (EGPA), the Japanese firm announced on 14 June. The project consists of solar farm construction and power generation with a photovoltaic and battery system. Batteries are usually a necessary back-up power source to stabilise power grids that utilise renewable energy. The project aims to produce around 210GWh/yr from solar power with around 40MWh/yr from battery storage, according to EGPA, with an operational capacity of around 98MW for solar and 20MW for battery. The firms plan to start construction during the second half of 2024, before it starts commercial operations during the first half of 2026, according to an Inpex representative that spoke to Argus . The Japanese firm did not disclose the investment amount but the investment value for construction of the project is estimated at "over $190mn", according to EGPA's website. Inpex bought a 50pc stake in EGPA in July 2023, with an aim of expanding its renewable generation portfolio. The firm regards Australia as a "core area" for boosting its renewable energy business, according to Inpex. By Yusuke Maekawa Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Low-CO2 biofuel feedstock imports to rise: USDA


24/06/13
24/06/13

Low-CO2 biofuel feedstock imports to rise: USDA

New York, 13 June (Argus) — A new US tax credit kicking off next year that is more generous for fuels that produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions will likely spur more imports of low-carbon feedstocks, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) said in a report this week. A raft of government incentives, including the federal renewable fuel standard and low-carbon fuel standards (LCFS) in states like California, has already spurred a boom in renewable diesel production, upping demand for feedstocks that can be used to make the fuel. The US was a net soybean oil importer for the first time ever in 2023 because of strong demand from domestic refineries, and the value of US imports of animal fats and vegetable oils more than doubled from 2020 to 2023 according to the report. That trend could become even more pronounced next year as the Inflation Reduction Act's 45Z tax credit, which offers up to $1.75/USG for sustainable aviation fuel and up to $1/USG for other fuels like renewable diesel, comes into force. The credit can only be claimed for fuel produced in the US, likely cutting biofuel imports and sending more feedstocks that would have been refined abroad to the US instead, the report says. The 45Z credit will also be more generous to fuels with lower carbon intensity, upping demand for waste feedstocks like used cooking oil that already fetch greater discounts in LCFS programs. Fast-rising imports of China-origin used cooking oil have already frustrated some agricultural groups, which lose out if there are more ample supplies of waste feedstocks. The report says that while soybean oil was the "crucial feedstock" allowing for the recent growth in US renewable diesel, its share of the feedstock mix has been trending downwards because of competition from lower-carbon feedstocks and lower-cost canola oil from Canada. While soybean oil exports have plunged because of the renewable diesel boom, they could recover slightly if refineries increasingly turning to waste feedstocks cuts into US soybean oil's current premium over global vegetable oils. The report adds that soybean oil's role in renewable diesel production is also at risk from rising supplies of soybean meal, which is produced alongside oil at crush plants and where the global demand picture is less clear. "Based on global demand for soybean meal, soybean oil cannot continue to fuel renewable diesel production growth at current rates during the next few years without major changes to global soybean meal demand, shifts in exporter market shares, or lower supplies in other exporting countries," the report says. By Cole Martin Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Bonn UN climate talks fail to advance new finance goal


24/06/13
24/06/13

Bonn UN climate talks fail to advance new finance goal

Bonn, 13 June (Argus) — Talks at the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Bonn, Germany, are coming to an end today and parties have little to show for their two weeks of negotiations on climate finance for developing countries. Progress on agreeing a new climate finance target — to replace a pledge that was missed by developed countries to give $100bn/yr to developing countries by 2020 — was limited and there are still significant divisions among parties, think-tank E3G said today. Details of the updated target must be finalised during the UN Cop 29 climate summit in Baku, Azerbaijan later this year. But so far negotiators have remained entrenched in their positions on key issues such as how much finance should be provided, who should contribute, who should benefit or qualify as "particularly vulnerable" and the quality of the finance — loans over grants — along with the role of private finance. Developed countries have not come forward with a number during the negotiations, despite being pressed repeatedly by developing nations to do so. The latter, including Saudi Arabia, India and African nations, are calling for at least $1 trillion-1.3 trillion/yr. The US said that it supports a goal that is "fit for purpose" and "from a floor of $100bn/yr". The EU and other developed nations argue that certain high-emitting developing countries, such as China or Saudi Arabia, should shoulder some of the finance, thereby broadening the donor base. But China made clear that it has no intention of doing that. "Developing countries voluntarily support each other beyond our capacity and we have no intention to make your numbers look good," the Chinese negotiator said. Pakistan's delegate rejected developed countries' proposals, which he said were not in line with the Paris Agreement, such as the obligation on developing countries to implement certain domestic measures in exchange for funding. Australia called parties out on a "game of word-count to measure balance" and said the new target amount should be "the star at the top of the Christmas tree" because "it is dependent on the structure, types of sources, the timeframe and breadth of contributor base". Meanwhile, Barbados pleaded for parties "to move forward" on the text as otherwise "more Small Island Developing States and Least Developed Countries will simply disappear from this gathering because we disappear from this planet". Although UNFCCC executive secretary Simon Stiell called for "serious progress" to be made on finance and for parties to move from "zero-draft to real options", these key issues will be left for top negotiators and ministers to tackle in Baku. The US election — which will take place a week before Cop 29 starts — is one of the biggest factors in moving the finance discussions forward, E3G policy adviser Tom Evans said. Convergence Consensus does seems to be forming on some issues, such as the need to make access to finance easier to least developed and vulnerable countries, discussing unsustainable debt and the cost of capital, and the need for more transparency — possibly in the context of the Enhanced Transparency Framework (ETF). The framework obliges parties to draw up biennial transparency reports, with the first due at the end of the year. The "very fundamental divide" between the two blocs on their perceptions around climate finance is underpinned by a lack of trust in the system, senior attorney Erika Lennon from the Center for International Environmental Law said. This is understandable given the time it took developed countries to fulfil their $100bn/yr pledge and the underwhelming performance so far of the different funding programmes, she added. With neither camp ready to compromise in Bonn, it remains to be seen who will "give", Evans of E3G said. By Chloe Jardine and Caroline Varin Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

UK political parties repeat existing stances on energy


24/06/13
24/06/13

UK political parties repeat existing stances on energy

London, 13 June (Argus) — The two main UK political parties have set out their plans, including on energy and climate change, with just three weeks until the general election. Energy security and the cost to consumers is a recurring theme for both, but the manifestos present some marked differences in approach to the energy transition. Both the incumbent Conservative and opposition Labour parties doubled down on existing positions in their respective manifestos. The Conservative party said that it remains committed to the UK's 2050 net zero emissions target, but promises a "pragmatic and proportionate" route. The party's manifesto guarantees "no new green levies or charges while accelerating the rollout of renewables". The UK's net zero goal is legally-binding, and was passed with significant cross-party support under a Conservative government in 2019. The Conservatives have been in power since 2010, and fielded five prime ministers in that time. Recent polling data show a substantial lead for Labour, which performed well at local elections in May. Labour placed strong focus on the opportunity the transition offers, saying that it would place the UK at the "forefront of climate action by creating the green jobs of the future at home and driving forward the energy transition on the global stage". The party has committed to zero-carbon power by 2030, although it would "maintain a strategic reserve of gas power stations to guarantee security of supply", it said. The Conservative manifesto reiterates the party's plans to build new gas-fired power plants. The party had previously committed to a decarbonised power grid by 2035, in line with a G7 pledge, although that is not mentioned in its manifesto. The two main parties clearly diverge on their approaches to North Sea oil and gas production. The Conservatives aim to keep the windfall tax — which effectively results in a 75pc rate — on oil and gas producers in place "until 2028-29, unless prices fall back to normal sooner". Labour confirmed plans to lift the rate to 78pc and run the tax until the end of the next parliament, which is likely to be mid-2029. Labour is also clear that it "will not revoke existing licences" in the North Sea, but it will not issue any new licences — for oil, gas or coal. The Conservatives restated the party's aim to legislate for annual North Sea licensing rounds . Both parties back nuclear energy, including small modular reactors — though those are unlikely to be operational until after 2030. And both pledge to cut planning bureaucracy and tackle grid connections. Labour's plans to "double onshore wind, triple solar power, and quadruple offshore wind by 2030" would result in installed capacity of 31GW, 48GW and 59GW, respectively, from a baseline of end-2023. The Conservatives' target to triple offshore wind by the end of the next parliament would put installed capacity at 44GW in 2029 — below the 50GW target for 2030 set in 2022 — while it said it supports solar and onshore wind in some circumstances. Finance in focus Both parties are keen to pull in private-sector investment, while Labour took up an original Conservative pledge to "make the UK the green finance capital of the world". And both pledge to address the cost of energy for consumers — Labour through local power generation projects and home insulation upgrades, and the Conservatives by ruling out any further "green levies". The latter plans to reverse London's expansion of the ultra-low emissions zone — originally planned by Conservative then-mayor and later prime minister Boris Johnson. Labour said that it would restore a phase-out date of 2030 for new internal combustion engine cars — which prime minister Rishi Sunak in September pushed back to 2035 . On an international level, both parties mention climate leadership at summits such as UN Cops. The Conservatives pledged to "ring-fence" the UK's climate finance commitments, while Labour committed to restore development spending to 0.7pc of gross national income "as soon as fiscal circumstances allow". By Georgia Gratton Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

IEA calls for suppliers of cookstove, SAF credits


24/06/13
24/06/13

IEA calls for suppliers of cookstove, SAF credits

London, 13 June (Argus) — The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has launched a call for tenders seeking cookstove and sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) credits, on behalf of the Paris-based International Energy Agency (IEA). The expression of interest is aimed at one or more suppliers that are able to provide "high-quality emissions reduction credits from clean cookstove projects" and "high-quality sustainable aviation fuel credits", according to the OECD tender document. The tender seeks to boost the IEA's decarbonisation efforts and closes on 28 June, 18:00pm Paris time (16:00 GMT). The document does not provide any information on volumes or vintages. The IEA had issued a similar tender in April 2023 that sought 10,000-15,000 credits of 2023 vintage deriving from clean cookstove projects to be supplied over the 2024-27 period. By Nicola De Sanctis Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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