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S Korea looks to roll out H2 certification system

  • Market: Hydrogen
  • 21/07/22

The South Korean government has announced plans to introduce a hydrogen certification system in 2024, aiming to expand institutional support for the country's hydrogen economy.

The government is carrying out research to prepare the certification system, which will take into account hydrogen production methods, international trends and domestic industrial status, the country's industry and trade ministry (Motie) said on 20 July. The draft will be released in 2023, with the system to be implemented in 2024.

Motie is seeking to address the need for a clean hydrogen certification system, as well as incentives for various hydrogen production methods like ammonia and carbon capture utilisation and storage (CCUS). An amendment to the Hydrogen Act was also recently passed to establish a legal basis for the creation of a clean hydrogen market, Motie said.

Various institutional support for hydrogen power generation sources is required for hydrogen and ammonia co-fired power generation policy and related systems. The government aims to introduce a "clean hydrogen power system" for hydrogen power plants in 2023, although more details on the plan were not provided.

The government has set a target to supply 100pc of hydrogen demand in 2050, or 27.9mn t, with clean hydrogen, and expand its clean hydrogen self-sufficiency rate to over 60pc.

"Hydrogen is the core of the new energy industry, and the government will provide solid institutional support to revitalise private investment," said Motie's second vice-minister Park Il-joon.

Motie will also provide policy support and regulatory innovations to support a privately-led hydrogen fund that was launched in early July, it said. Industry body Korean H2 Business Summit launched the hydrogen fund with the aim of raising 500bn South Korean won ($381mn) by the end of this year, to enable it to start making investments in 2023.

Motie also highlighted the need for more hydrogen charging infrastructure such as fuel cells to be installed in existing gas and LPG charging stations to increase accessibility.

South Korea has been increasing its decarbonisation efforts, with the government attempting to achieve 2050 net-zero emissions through a complete coal phase-out. The western province of South Chungcheong is planning to build hydrogen fuel cell plants following the planned retirement of its 14 coal-fired units by 2032.

South Korean companies have also started investing in hydrogen, with automakers Hyundai and Rolls Royce agreeing to jointly develop hydrogen fuel cell technology, and LG Chem planning to build a 50,000 t/yr hydrogen plant in Daesan by 2024.


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EU’s von der Leyen re-elected as Commission president

EU’s von der Leyen re-elected as Commission president

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Spain includes SAF, marine fuels in renewables targets


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17/07/24

Spain includes SAF, marine fuels in renewables targets

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EU must review 'overly ambitious' H2 targets: Audit


17/07/24
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17/07/24

EU must review 'overly ambitious' H2 targets: Audit

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Shell quits Swedish e-SAF plant plan


05/07/24
News
05/07/24

Shell quits Swedish e-SAF plant plan

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Indonesia aims to launch 15 CCUS projects by 2030


05/07/24
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05/07/24

Indonesia aims to launch 15 CCUS projects by 2030

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