Overview

The potash market has been disrupted from its traditional trade flows and typically slow-moving price cycles, affected by new entrants, new mines, military conflicts and political tensions in countries that either produce or consume some of the largest quantities of potash in the world. The need for accurate insight and data is more acute than ever.

Our extensive potash coverage includes MOP, SOP and NOP. Argus has many decades of experience covering the potash market and we incorporate our multi-commodity market expertise to provide potash price assessments, analysis and data that provides the full narrative. 

Argus support market participants with:

  • Weekly potash price assessments, proprietary data and market commentary
  • Short and medium to long-term forecasting, modelling and analysis of potash prices, supply, demand, trade and projects
  • Bespoke consulting project support

Latest potash news

Browse the latest market moving news on the global potash industry.

Latest potash news

Fertilizer affordability falls from May on higher urea


08/07/24
Latest potash news
08/07/24

Fertilizer affordability falls from May on higher urea

London, 8 July (Argus) — Global fertilizer product affordability has weakened sharply over the past two months on lower crop prices and higher urea prices following supply restrictions at key producers in Egypt. Nutrient affordability fell to 1.06 points in the first week of July, from an average of 1.24 points in May. An affordability index above one indicates that fertilizers are more affordable, compared with the base year, which was set in 2004, while below one indicates lower nutrient affordability. The decline in nutrient affordability over the past two months comes as farmers prepare to harvest grain crops in the northern hemisphere. The fertilizer index ⁠— which includes international prices for urea, DAP and potash, adjusted by global usage ⁠— reached the highest value since March, mostly driven by a jump in urea prices, which weighs heavily on the fertilizer index owing to the relatively higher global usage when compared to DAP and potash. Prices for urea surged from May into early July, supported by tight spot availability, as urea plants in Egypt were affected by gas supply constraints from mid-late May. The unplanned urea plant shutdowns in Egypt caught the market by surprise and resulted in the Middle East benchmark rising by an average of 23pc since May, to $353.5/t fob on a midpoint basis in the first week of July. But output at some urea plants in Egypt has started to resume from early this month following the restoration of natural gas supply, which should help to improve availability and provide some respite to overall supply tightness. By Lili Minton Affordability Index Regional Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Latest potash news

Fertistream buys Africa-focused Nutrisource


05/07/24
Latest potash news
05/07/24

Fertistream buys Africa-focused Nutrisource

London, 5 July (Argus) — UAE-based trading firm Fertistream has acquired Singapore-based Nutrisource and its fertilizer assets in Africa. The deal includes the purchase of Nutrisource's new 200,000 t/yr blending unit in Togo. The unit has 60,000t of storage capacity for raw materials and 30,000t for finished product. Production of blends at the facility is expected to begin in the fourth quarter, for sale to the local region. The new unit will have the ability to produce high-phosphate NPK blends, which are in demand in the region, as well as tailored blends to meet the needs of regional crops and soils. The unit is north of the port of Lome, enabling it to supply neighbouring countries, including Burkina Faso, Ghana, Niger, Benin and Mali. Fertistream has sold almost 500,000t of fertilizers to African markets so far this year, and the acquisition will further strengthen the company's position in the continent, especially in west Africa. By Nykole King Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Latest potash news

Possible Canadian rail strike start delayed again


31/05/24
Latest potash news
31/05/24

Possible Canadian rail strike start delayed again

Washington, 31 May (Argus) — The start of a threatened strike by some union workers at Canadian National (CN) and Canadian Pacific Kansas City (CPKC) has been pushed back again as concerns about fuel and food supplies rise. If it goes forward, the strike would begin sometime after 17 June at the earliest. The Canada Industrial Relations Board (CIRB), which is investigating federal government concerns, has postponed reply comments to 14 June from 31 May. Original comments were due by 21 May. If CIRB ruled on 15 June, the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference (TCRC) would have to provide three days' notice to CN and CPKC before workers could strike. But a strike may still may not occur for another 60 days . If CIRB issues any orders, the parties would likely not be in a position for a strike or lockout to begin for two months, CPKC said on 16 May. TCRC members had authorized a strike to start as early as 22 May. The railroads and union met with CIRB on Monday and discussed the comments filed by groups that could be affected by a strike. Canadian minister of labour Seamus O'Regan asked CIRB earlier this month to consider requiring some rail service to continue in the event of a strike to help avoid health and safety issues related to propane supply. A number of concerns arising from the comments have been identified, with many focused on the impact to commercial and economic interests, CIRB said. The theme of certain comments concerned delivery of supplies of propane and diesel to critical areas, including and remote communities in northern British Columbia. Transportation also is important to the province of Manitoba which has been using rail to deliver fuel because of a Winnipeg products pipeline. Other comments focused on domestic and global food security. They noted some sectors are dependent on rail for transportation, such as fertilizer, potash and canola products, CIRB said. The potential, immediate impact on the supply of water treatment materials for several municipalities also was highlighted. Other commentators sought advance warning of strike, asking CIRB to provide notice of when a decision would be made or that there be an extension of the notice required before a strike or lockout. Negotiations between the railroads and TCRC continue. CN and the union will meet next week from 4-6 June. CPKC declined to comment on talks but met most recently with TCRC leadership between 15-21 May. By Abby Caplan Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Latest potash news

Potential strike threatens Vancouver port again


13/05/24
Latest potash news
13/05/24

Potential strike threatens Vancouver port again

Calgary, 13 May (Argus) — A labour dispute at the Canadian port of Vancouver could result in another work stoppage, less than a year after a strike disrupted the flow of more than C$10bn ($7.3bn) worth of goods and commodities ranging from canola and potash to coking coal. Negotiations between the British Columbia Maritime Employers Association (BCMEA) and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) Ship and Dock Foremen Local 514 union have stalled as the two sides try to renew an agreement that expired on 1 April 2023. A 21-day "cooling-off period" concluded on 10 May, giving the union the right to strike and the employers association the right to lock out the workers. A vote and 72-hour notice would first need to occur before either action is taken. The BCMEA filed a formal complaint to the Canada Industrial Relations Board (CIRB) the same day, which had to step in last year in another dispute. The BCMEA locked horns with ILWU Canada over a separate collective agreement in 2023 leading to a 13-day strike by the union in July. This disrupted the movement of C$10.7bn of goods in and out of Canada, according to the Greater Vancouver Board of Trade. Vancouver's port is the country's largest — about the same size as the next five combined — and describes itself as able to handle the most diversified range of cargo in North America. There are 29 terminals belonging to the Port of Vancouver. Terminals that service container ships endured the most significant congestion during last year's strike. Loadings for potash, sulphur, lumber, wood pellets and pulp, steel-making coal, canola, copper concentrates, zinc and lead concentrate, diesel and renewable diesel liquids and some agri-foods were also disrupted. The Trans Mountain-operated Westridge Marine Terminal responsible for crude oil exports on Canada's west coast was unaffected. A deal was eventually reached on 4 August. The strike spurred on proposed amendments to legislation in Canada that would limit the effect of job action on essential services. A bill introduced in Canada's Parliament in November would update the Canada Labour Code and CIRB Regulations accordingly. The bill has been progressing through the House of Commons, now having completed the second of three readings. By Brett Holmes Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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