Braya begins renewable diesel production

  • Market: Biofuels, Hydrogen
  • 22/02/24

Canada's Braya Renewable Fuels today launched commercial operations at its renewable fuels plant in Come By Chance, New Foundland and Labrador.

Braya expects to produce 18,000 b/d of renewable diesel, using internally-produced traditional hydrogen. It envisions expanding its diesel capacity to 35,000 b/d and adding sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) production in the future.

It also said it is in the early stages of exploring renewable hydrogen production at the refinery to lower its carbon footprint, but does not have a timeline. Last year it began seeking a supplier of 35,000 t/yr of renewable hydrogen to support its diesel and SAF production, and in March 2023 selected German renewables developer ABO Wind as its preferred supplier.

Braya's ownership group Cresta Fund Management acquired the 130,000 b/d petroleum refinery in 2020 and began work to convert the facility to produce renewable fuels in late 2021. Initially it aimed to produce 14,000 b/d of renewable diesel and targeted SAF production in mid-2022, but a fire in September 2022 postponed startup.


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17/04/24

Idemitsu books rare US Gulf-Vancouver HVO cargo

Idemitsu books rare US Gulf-Vancouver HVO cargo

New York, 17 April (Argus) — Japanese oil company Idemitsu provisionally hired a medium range (MR) tanker to carry hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) from the US Gulf coast to Vancouver on 16 April, a sign of the growing HVO trade from the region into west coast North America. Idemitsu put the Stolt Sisto MR on subjects for a US Gulf coast-Vancouver voyage from 20-25 April at $2.35mn lumpsum. The fixture may be part of an agreement under which Vertex Energy supplies Idemitsu's California-based subsidiary, Idemitsu Apollo, with all of its renewable diesel production from its plant in Mobile, Alabama. The plant's exports are targeting "growing regional markets in the western United States and Canada", according to Vertex. High freight costs for US domestic shipments because of the Jones Act may be encouraging Idemitsu to focus on the Canadian market. In comparison, freight for a US-flagged MR on a New Orleans-Los Angeles voyage was equivalent to $4.34mn, nearly double the cost of a voyage to more distant Vancouver. "I think [demand from Vancouver] will keep expanding with the subsidies/grants," a shipbroker said. "There is not much production in Vancouver, just Parkland [refinery]." Canadian oil company Suncor typically books one MR vessel a month to carry HVO from the US Gulf coast to Vancouver, with two charters in October 2023 standing out as a particularly active month for the trade, according to ship fixtures compiled by Argus . But Idemitsu has been "jumping in on the action" in recent months, according to the shipbroker, provisionally hiring at least one MR tanker on the spot market in January and February before yesterday's deal. Vancouver buyers are also getting HVO from Asia-Pacific suppliers, and countries like South Korea could become increasingly competitive in the renewable trade overall as they ramp up their sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) and HVO production in the coming years. Vancouver imported around 29,500 b/d of HVO in January 2024, including 16,612 b/d from the US, 7,548 b/d from South Korea, and 5,351 b/d from Taiwan, according to Kpler data. By Ross Griffith Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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Singapore's MPA, IEA unite on maritime decarbonisation


17/04/24
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17/04/24

Singapore's MPA, IEA unite on maritime decarbonisation

Singapore, 17 April (Argus) — The Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) and the IEA have signed an initial deal to push the transition to zero and near zero emission fuels, while working on technology as well as digitalisation to meet the maritime decarbonisation agenda. The agreement, signed by MPA chief executive Teo Eng Dih and IEA executive director Faith Birol, was announced at the Singapore Maritime Week 2024 (SMW) this week. "Greater international collaboration in maritime and energy industries is critical for international shipping to meet international decarbonisation goals," Teo said. "Shipping is one of the hardest sectors to decarbonise and we need to spur development and deployment of new technologies to slow and then reverse the rise in its emissions," said IEA chief economist Tim Gould. "This will require strong collaboration at a national and international level." Training programmes will be built to support the adoption of new fuels. There will also be partnerships made towards fuel-related projects and initiatives such as the International Maritime Organisation-Singapore NextGen project. The IEA plans to open its first regional co-operation centre in Singapore, which will be its first regional office outside of its headquarters in Paris, France. By Mahua Chakravarty Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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US Gulf lowest-cost green ammonia in 2030: Report


16/04/24
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16/04/24

US Gulf lowest-cost green ammonia in 2030: Report

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Singapore, Rotterdam advance 'green' shipping corridor


15/04/24
News
15/04/24

Singapore, Rotterdam advance 'green' shipping corridor

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Gunvor set for buying spree after windfall: CEO


12/04/24
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12/04/24

Gunvor set for buying spree after windfall: CEO

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