245Recycle to build Houston pyrolysis plant

  • Market: Petrochemicals
  • 27/02/24

Houston-based chemical recycler 245Recycle plans to build a pyrolysis recycling plant in the greater Houston area, with plans to be operational by 2027.

The 400t/yr plant will use Lummus pyrolysis technology to make pyrolysis oil from post-consumer polypropylene and low- and high-density polyethylene.

"Partnering with Lummus on our first facility is a significant milestone in our mission to improve circularity for operators in the downstream energy industry," 245Recycle chief executive Robert Sawchuk said.

245Recycle is a new entrant to the chemical recycling space, and was founded in March 2023 by former petrochemical executives. The company did not provide detail start-up costs for the project.


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15/04/24

Overseas companies get US FDA polymers certifications

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Houston, 15 April (Argus) — European and Asian companies have received a spate of FDA no objection letters (NOL) this year, a growing indication of overseas interest in the US recycled polymers market. FDA no objection letters allow recyclers to sell their recycled plastic pellets for use in limited food and drink-grade applications. Ultra-Poly and Circulus Holdings are the only two US-based companies who have received NOLs so far in 2024, out of a total of 14 different companies. Circulus received approval to use recycled low density polyethylene (LDPE) from its Ardmore, Oklahoma, facility for food contact in January, and Ultra-Poly received approval to use its recycled injection-molded polypropylene for food contact in March. Austrian recycler Borealis received two NOLs this year from the FDA, for its polypropylene and its high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and German recycler Gneuss Kunststofftechnik has received three, for HDPE, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polystyrene (PS). Italian chemicals company Versalis received approval for its recycled PS. Recyclers from East and Southeast Asia made up the rest of this year's approvals so far, for PP, PS, and HDPE. Recipients include the Pashupati Group from India, China-based Shanghai SmartLoop Industrial, and the Japan-based DIC Coporation. Growing imports from overseas greatly increased supply of recycled material in 2023 and 2024, but some domestic producers fear that the lower pricing from some overseas manufacturers will threaten their ability to stay in business. By Zach Kluver Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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G7 leaders to meet over Iran's attack on Israel


14/04/24
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14/04/24

G7 leaders to meet over Iran's attack on Israel

Dubai, 14 April (Argus) — Leaders of the G7 will meet today, 14 April, to co-ordinate a diplomatic response to Iran's overnight air attack on Israel, which ushered a new phase in a six-month conflict that is threatening regional escalation. G7 presidency Italy "has organized a conference at leaders' level for the afternoon of today," Italian prime minister Giorgia Meloni said on X, formerly Twitter. US President Joe Biden has pledged a co-ordinated G7 diplomatic response and condemned the Iranian assault. Iran fired hundreds of drones and missiles against Israel on the evening of 13 April, according to the country's state-owned news agency Irna. Almost all were intercepted before they reached Israeli airspace and there were no fatalities reported by Israel. One civilian was injured and an air force base in southern Israel was lightly damaged, according to the Israel Defence Forces (IDF). The Iranian attack came in response to a suspected Israeli air strike on the vicinity of Iran's embassy compound in Damascus, Syria, on 1 April. Tehran's foreign minster Hossein Amir-Abdollahian said Iran considers this to be the end of its operation. But energy markets, which have been supported in recent weeks by a geopolitical risk premium, will face a week of uncertainty about whether Israel will retaliate. The front-month June Ice Brent contract was trading at $90.45/bl before markets closed for the weekend, and hit a more-than five month high of $92.18/bl on Friday, 12 April. Israeli officials said the attack was "a severe and dangerous escalation" from Tehran. Israel's war cabinet is meeting today to discuss a response. "We will build a regional coalition and exact the price from Iran in the fashion and timing that is right for us," said cabinet minister Benny Gantz. The US is urging Israel to claim victory for its defence, in an apparent effort to discourage Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu's government from feeling compelled to retaliate. While noting that Israel ultimately will make the decision as to how to respond, White House national security communications co-ordinator John Kirby, in a televised interview today, hailed what he called Israel's "incredible military achievement" in defending itself against the attack. Very little managed to penetrate the defensive shield, "and the damage was extraordinarily light," he said. The US military played a role in helping to defend against the attack, bringing down "several dozens of drones and missiles," Kirby said. UK prime minister Rishi Sunak said the Royal Air Force shot down "a number of Iranian attack drones". Israel's western allies are urging it to show restraint as they try to prevent a wider conflict in the Middle East, which could directly affect oil producers and send energy prices soaring. President Biden is especially keen to avoid such a scenario in an election year. By Bachar Halabi and David Ivanovich Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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French union eyes strike over Exxon's petchem closure


12/04/24
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12/04/24

French union eyes strike over Exxon's petchem closure

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Panama Canal to restrict May transits on work


09/04/24
News
09/04/24

Panama Canal to restrict May transits on work

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France Port Jerome refinery restart likely in early May


08/04/24
News
08/04/24

France Port Jerome refinery restart likely in early May

Barcelona, 8 April (Argus) — Workers at ExxonMobil's 236,000 b/d Port Jerome refinery in northern France said today the plant is likely to resume operations in May, following a fire there earlier in the year. "We think it could restart in early May if everything goes to plan," said a worker today. The fire in a crude distillation unit (CDU) at the start of March halted operations , and injured workers and members of the fire service. The 1.15mn b/d French downstream complex had a period of around six months in the second half of 2023 when it ran without any incident, the first time in around four years. This ended at the end of last year when TotalEnergies' 219,000 b/d Donges refinery, on the Atlantic coast, halted after inspections by local authorities. By Adam Porter Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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