Overview

The marine fuel sector is decarbonising. International Maritime Organization (IMO) requirements and EU legislation is driving this change alongside consumer demand for low carbon solutions. 

These drivers have prompted shipowners to invest in alternative marine fuels including; marine biodiesel, bio-methanol, grey methanol, LNG, ammonia and hydrogen.

Argus provides pricing, insights, and intelligence for the fast-growing alternative marine fuels market with independent news, analysis, and market commentary on emerging changes and trends so you can stay ahead.

Argus Market Highlights: Marine Fuels

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Latest alternative marine fuels news

Latest alternative marine fuels news
24/04/17

Idemitsu books rare US Gulf-Vancouver HVO cargo

Idemitsu books rare US Gulf-Vancouver HVO cargo

New York, 17 April (Argus) — Japanese oil company Idemitsu provisionally hired a medium range (MR) tanker to carry hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) from the US Gulf coast to Vancouver on 16 April, a sign of the growing HVO trade from the region into west coast North America. Idemitsu put the Stolt Sisto MR on subjects for a US Gulf coast-Vancouver voyage from 20-25 April at $2.35mn lumpsum. The fixture may be part of an agreement under which Vertex Energy supplies Idemitsu's California-based subsidiary, Idemitsu Apollo, with all of its renewable diesel production from its plant in Mobile, Alabama. The plant's exports are targeting "growing regional markets in the western United States and Canada", according to Vertex. High freight costs for US domestic shipments because of the Jones Act may be encouraging Idemitsu to focus on the Canadian market. In comparison, freight for a US-flagged MR on a New Orleans-Los Angeles voyage was equivalent to $4.34mn, nearly double the cost of a voyage to more distant Vancouver. "I think [demand from Vancouver] will keep expanding with the subsidies/grants," a shipbroker said. "There is not much production in Vancouver, just Parkland [refinery]." Canadian oil company Suncor typically books one MR vessel a month to carry HVO from the US Gulf coast to Vancouver, with two charters in October 2023 standing out as a particularly active month for the trade, according to ship fixtures compiled by Argus . But Idemitsu has been "jumping in on the action" in recent months, according to the shipbroker, provisionally hiring at least one MR tanker on the spot market in January and February before yesterday's deal. Vancouver buyers are also getting HVO from Asia-Pacific suppliers, and countries like South Korea could become increasingly competitive in the renewable trade overall as they ramp up their sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) and HVO production in the coming years. Vancouver imported around 29,500 b/d of HVO in January 2024, including 16,612 b/d from the US, 7,548 b/d from South Korea, and 5,351 b/d from Taiwan, according to Kpler data. By Ross Griffith Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Latest alternative marine fuels news

EPS to register six ammonia-powered newbuilds with SRS


24/04/17
Latest alternative marine fuels news
24/04/17

EPS to register six ammonia-powered newbuilds with SRS

London, 17 April (Argus) — Shipping firm Eastern Pacific Shipping (EPS) will register six dual-fuel ammonia powered vessels, due to be delivered from 2026, with the Singapore Registry of Ships (SRS). The commitment is part of an initial agreement with Singapore's Maritime and Port Authority (MPA), vessel classification organisation American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) and Lloyd's Register. EPS said the collaboration with the MPA will extend to supporting crew and seafarer training on the vessels powered by "zero and near-zero emission fuels", in addition to pilot trials of these fuels, and building on the capacity and infrastructure required for ammonia bunkering. Argus assessed the price of green ammonia dob east Asia on a very-low sulphur fuel oil energy density equivalent (VLSFOe) at $2,608.90/t in March, a premium of over $1,975.08/t against VLSFO dob Singapore. Grey ammonia in east Asia was assessed at an average of $829.52/t VLSFOe across March, a premium of $195.70/t to VLSFO dob Singapore. By Hussein Al-Khalisy Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Latest alternative marine fuels news

Singapore's MPA, IEA unite on maritime decarbonisation


24/04/17
Latest alternative marine fuels news
24/04/17

Singapore's MPA, IEA unite on maritime decarbonisation

Singapore, 17 April (Argus) — The Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) and the IEA have signed an initial deal to push the transition to zero and near zero emission fuels, while working on technology as well as digitalisation to meet the maritime decarbonisation agenda. The agreement, signed by MPA chief executive Teo Eng Dih and IEA executive director Faith Birol, was announced at the Singapore Maritime Week 2024 (SMW) this week. "Greater international collaboration in maritime and energy industries is critical for international shipping to meet international decarbonisation goals," Teo said. "Shipping is one of the hardest sectors to decarbonise and we need to spur development and deployment of new technologies to slow and then reverse the rise in its emissions," said IEA chief economist Tim Gould. "This will require strong collaboration at a national and international level." Training programmes will be built to support the adoption of new fuels. There will also be partnerships made towards fuel-related projects and initiatives such as the International Maritime Organisation-Singapore NextGen project. The IEA plans to open its first regional co-operation centre in Singapore, which will be its first regional office outside of its headquarters in Paris, France. By Mahua Chakravarty Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Latest alternative marine fuels news

US Gulf lowest-cost green ammonia in 2030: Report


24/04/16
Latest alternative marine fuels news
24/04/16

US Gulf lowest-cost green ammonia in 2030: Report

New York, 16 April (Argus) — The US Gulf coast will likely be the lowest cost source of green ammonia to top global bunkering ports Singapore and Rotterdam by 2030, according to a study by independent non-profits Rocky Mountain Institute and the Global Maritime Forum. Green ammonia in Singapore is projected to be sourced from the US Gulf coast at $1,100/t, Chile at $1,850/t, Australia at $1,940/t, Namibia at $2,050/t and India at $2,090/t very low-sulphur fuel oil equivalent (VLSFOe) in 2030. Singapore is also projected to procure green methanol from the US Gulf coast at $1,330/t, China at $1,640/t, Australia at $2,610/t and Egypt at $2,810/t VLSFOe in 2030. The US Gulf coast would be cheaper for both Chinese bio-methanol and Egyptian or Australian e-methanol. But modeling suggests that competition could result in US methanol going to other ports, particularly in Europe, unless the Singaporean port ecosystem moves to proactively secure supply, says the study. In addition to space constraints imposed by its geography, Singapore has relatively poor wind and solar energy sources, which makes local production of green hydrogen-based-fuels expensive, says the study. Singapore locally produced green methanol and green ammonia are projected at $2,910/t and $2,800/t VLSFOe, respectively, in 2030, higher than imports, even when considering the extra transport costs. The study projects that fossil fuels would account for 47mn t VLSFOe, or 95pc of Singapore's marine fuel demand in 2030. The remaining 5pc will be allocated between green ammonia (about 1.89mn t VLSFOe) and green methanol (3.30mn t VLSFOe). Rotterdam to pull from US Gulf Green ammonia in Rotterdam is projected to be sourced from the US Gulf coast at $1,080/t, locally produced at $2,120/t, sourced from Spain at $2,150/t and from Brazil at $2,310/t. Rotterdam is also projected to procure green methanol from China at $1,830/t, Denmark at $2,060/t, locally produce it at $2,180/t and from Finland at $2,190/t VLSFOe, among other countries, but not the US Gulf coast . The study projects that fossil fuels would account for 8.1mn t VLSFOe, or 95pc of Rotterdam's marine fuel demand in 2030. The remaining 5pc will be allocated between green ammonia, at about 326,000t, and green methanol, at about 570,000t VLSFOe. Rotterdam has a good renewable energy potential, according to the study. But Rotterdam is also a significant industrial cluster and several of the industries in the port's hinterland are seeking to use hydrogen for decarbonisation. As such, the port is expected to import most of its green hydrogen-based fuel supply. Though US-produced green fuels are likely to be in high demand, Rotterdam can benefit from EU incentives for hydrogen imports, lower-emission fuel demand created by the EU emissions trading system and FuelEU Maritime. But the EU's draft Renewable Energy Directive could limit the potential for European ports like Rotterdam to import US green fuels. The draft requirements in the Directive disallow fuel from some projects that benefit from renewable electricity incentives, like the renewable energy production tax credit provided by the US's Inflation Reduction Act, after 2028. If these draft requirements are accepted in the final regulation, they could limit the window of opportunity for hydrogen imports from the US to Rotterdam to the period before 2028, says the study. By Stefka Wechsler Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Latest alternative marine fuels news

Singapore offers alternative marine fuel training hub


24/04/16
Latest alternative marine fuels news
24/04/16

Singapore offers alternative marine fuel training hub

Singapore, 16 April (Argus) — Singapore plans to offer maritime energy training for seafarers to handle vessels with sustainable marine fuels as the industry advances towards its decarbonisation goals. "With hundreds of crew change conducted daily here, Singapore's Maritime Energy Training Facility (METF) is well placed to support the training of international seafarers. Shipowners and operators can expect time and training cost savings by tapping METF's training facilities," the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) said. A gap in workforce knowledge remains a barrier in the maritime sector's transition to future fuels. This is despite an expected increase in supplies and consumption of alternative marine fuels, accelerated by the International Maritime Organisation's target of net zero greenhouses gas emissions by 2050 . The maritime sector has recognised the need for workforce upskilling and value chain integration . Safety in handling, bunkering and managing alternative fuels like methanol and ammonia is one of the highlights of the METF training, with workers to be trained in a new dual-fuel engine simulator. The METF curriculum also covers methanol firefighting for shipboard and terminal fires conducted by the Singapore Maritime Academy, along with safety protocols used during the first ship-to-container ship bunkering of bio-methanol on 27 July last year. "Around 10,000 seafarers and other maritime personnel are expected to be trained at METF from now to the 2030s, as the facilities are progressively developed by 2026," the MPA announced, adding that the new curriculum will roll out gradually from this year. By Cassia Teo Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

Alternative fuels vessels and supplier list

Argus lists vessels that are burning alternative marine fuels, including methanol, biofuels, ammonia, hydrogen, LNG, LPG, as well as those running on batteries. The database is updated every month.

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Scrubbers

Argus’ scrubber database is the only database to provide granular vessels details such as vessel name, owner, IMO number, deadweight, etc.

The database is updated every month. It contains over 4,300 records and counting.

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Explore our related services

With deep expertise in the markets for future marine fuels, Argus can provide detailed insight for the marine industry as it transitions towards decarbonisation. Here are some of our related services: