Atualização: Petrobras elevará produção de diesel S10

  • Market: Crude oil, LPG, Oil products
  • 18/01/24

Adiciona valor do investimento no 4º parágrafo e planos para renováveis no 7º e 8º parágrafo

A Petrobras retomará as obras de expansão da Refinaria Abreu e Lima (Rnest), aumentando a produção de diesel S10 em 13.000 m³/d até 2028.

Na segunda metade de 2024, a estatal reiniciará a construção do Trem 2 na refinaria, visando elevar sua capacidade de processamento de petróleo de 230.000 b/d para 260.000 b/d, também em 2028. A melhoria aumentará a produção de derivados de petróleo da companhia – incluindo gasolina, GLP e nafta, mas principalmente diesel S10.

As obras para a implementação da unidade haviam sido interrompidas em 2015.

O investimento de R$6 bilhões a R$8 bilhões permitirá que o Brasil seja mais "autossuficiente na produção de combustíveis, reduzindo a demanda de importação", disse a empresa.

"A Petrobras estima um aumento de produção de diesel da ordem de 40pc nos próximos anos", afirmou o presidente da estatal, Jean Paul Prates.

Neste ano, a companhia também começará obras para proporcionar aumento de carga, melhor escoamento de produtos leves e maior capacidade de processamento de petróleo do pré-sal no Trem 1, unidade já existente da Rnest, até o primeiro trimestre de 2025.

As atualizações auxiliarão a Rnest a produzir renováveis, como diesel R, hidrogênio e e-metanol, disse Prates, durante a cerimônia oficial de retomada dos investimentos.

A Petrobras vê a possibilidade de adaptar a refinaria para o futuro, com produção de diesel R5, R10, R15,de acordo com o presidente da Petrobras. "Em 50 anos, essa refinaria vai estar aqui do mesmo jeito, com as mesmas máquinas, para produzir R100, diesel de origem vegetal."

Além disso, a empresa espera instalar a primeira planta do país a transformar óxido de enxofre e óxido de nitrogênio em um novo produto não especificado. O projeto já está em andamento e deve iniciar operações ainda em 2024.

A retomada da ampliação na Rnest é parte do plano estratégico da Petrobras para 2024-28 e do Novo Programa de Aceleração do Crescimento (PAC), do governo federal.

A Rnest é localizada no Complexo Industrial do Porto de Suape, em Pernambuco, e é o "principal polo para a Petrobras nas regiões Norte e Nordeste, com acesso fácil por cabotagem para mercados consumidores", informou a empresa.


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13/06/24

UK political parties repeat existing stances on energy

UK political parties repeat existing stances on energy

London, 13 June (Argus) — The two main UK political parties have set out their plans, including on energy and climate change, with just three weeks until the general election. Energy security and the cost to consumers is a recurring theme for both, but the manifestos present some marked differences in approach to the energy transition. Both the incumbent Conservative and opposition Labour parties doubled down on existing positions in their respective manifestos. The Conservative party said that it remains committed to the UK's 2050 net zero emissions target, but promises a "pragmatic and proportionate" route. The party's manifesto guarantees "no new green levies or charges while accelerating the rollout of renewables". The UK's net zero goal is legally-binding, and was passed with significant cross-party support under a Conservative government in 2019. The Conservatives have been in power since 2010, and fielded five prime ministers in that time. Recent polling data show a substantial lead for Labour, which performed well at local elections in May. Labour placed strong focus on the opportunity the transition offers, saying that it would place the UK at the "forefront of climate action by creating the green jobs of the future at home and driving forward the energy transition on the global stage". The party has committed to zero-carbon power by 2030, although it would "maintain a strategic reserve of gas power stations to guarantee security of supply", it said. The Conservative manifesto reiterates the party's plans to build new gas-fired power plants. The party had previously committed to a decarbonised power grid by 2035, in line with a G7 pledge, although that is not mentioned in its manifesto. The two main parties clearly diverge on their approaches to North Sea oil and gas production. The Conservatives aim to keep the windfall tax — which effectively results in a 75pc rate — on oil and gas producers in place "until 2028-29, unless prices fall back to normal sooner". Labour confirmed plans to lift the rate to 78pc and run the tax until the end of the next parliament, which is likely to be mid-2029. Labour is also clear that it "will not revoke existing licences" in the North Sea, but it will not issue any new licences — for oil, gas or coal. The Conservatives restated the party's aim to legislate for annual North Sea licensing rounds . Both parties back nuclear energy, including small modular reactors — though those are unlikely to be operational until after 2030. And both pledge to cut planning bureaucracy and tackle grid connections. Labour's plans to "double onshore wind, triple solar power, and quadruple offshore wind by 2030" would result in installed capacity of 31GW, 48GW and 59GW, respectively, from a baseline of end-2023. The Conservatives' target to triple offshore wind by the end of the next parliament would put installed capacity at 44GW in 2029 — below the 50GW target for 2030 set in 2022 — while it said it supports solar and onshore wind in some circumstances. Finance in focus Both parties are keen to pull in private-sector investment, while Labour took up an original Conservative pledge to "make the UK the green finance capital of the world". And both pledge to address the cost of energy for consumers — Labour through local power generation projects and home insulation upgrades, and the Conservatives by ruling out any further "green levies". The latter plans to reverse London's expansion of the ultra-low emissions zone — originally planned by Conservative then-mayor and later prime minister Boris Johnson. Labour said that it would restore a phase-out date of 2030 for new internal combustion engine cars — which prime minister Rishi Sunak in September pushed back to 2035 . On an international level, both parties mention climate leadership at summits such as UN Cops. The Conservatives pledged to "ring-fence" the UK's climate finance commitments, while Labour committed to restore development spending to 0.7pc of gross national income "as soon as fiscal circumstances allow". By Georgia Gratton Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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Opec reopens rift with IEA on peak demand


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13/06/24

Opec reopens rift with IEA on peak demand

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Competing US farm bill drafts boost SAF


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12/06/24

Competing US farm bill drafts boost SAF

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US Fed signals one rate cut this year


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US inflation eases to 3.3pc in May as Fed meets


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12/06/24

US inflation eases to 3.3pc in May as Fed meets

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