MME propõe aliança global para fomentar biocombustíveis

  • Market: Biofuels, Natural gas
  • 19/01/24

O ministro de Minas e Energia, Alexandre Silveira, propôs a criação de uma agência global para financiar a adoção de energias renováveis, em meio a esforços do Brasil para liderar a corrida mundial pela descarbonização.

Silveira compartilhou a iniciativa durante uma reunião da Aliança Global dos Biocombustíveis, no Fórum Econômico Mundial, em Davos, na Suíça, em 18 de janeiro.

Atualmente, o Brasil ocupa a presidência do G20, o que fornece "o foro necessário para consolidar os biocombustíveis como importantes vetores de promoção da transição energética", disse o ministro.

O diretor da Agência Internacional de Energia (IEA, na sigla em inglês), Fatih Birol, reconheceu as ações do país para desenvolver o setor de biocombustíveis e descarbonizar a frota de transportes, assim como seu potencial para a produção de biogás e biometano. O ministro de Petróleo e Gás Natural da Índia, Hardeep Singh Puri, também participou do encontro.

As questões ambientais possuem destaque na agenda do governo do presidente Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva desde a campanha eleitoral de 2022.

Em setembro de 2023, o governo federal apresentou o Projeto de Lei Combustível do Futuro para acelerar a transição energética e substituir gradualmente os combustíveis fósseis.

O programa pretende aumentar a mescla do etanol na gasolina, definir metas de emissões para o setor aéreo e incorporar gradativamente o diesel verde na matriz brasileira de combustíveis.


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PetroVietnam, South Korea’s Mubo partner on gas

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Indian regulator seeks oversight of LNG terminals


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21/06/24

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20/06/24

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20/06/24
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20/06/24

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