INEOS, Hanwha partner on US blue ammonia project

  • Market: Fertilizers
  • 28/05/24

South Korea's Hanwha and global chemical company INEOS agreed to collaborate on a blue ammonia production facility in the US.

The partners anticipate the project to reach a capacity of more than 1mn metric tonnes/yr and the CO2 emissions from the facility will be sequestered.

The heads of terms agreement entered into by the companies will allow them to determine the feasibility of a blue ammonia facility in the US. The location of the plant has not been determined.

The two companies aim to make a final investment decision in 2026 and to begin operations in 2030.

If the project is developed it will contribute to INEOS' 2030 carbon emission reduction target and its 2050 net zero ambitions.


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