P66 Rodeo producing 30,000 b/d of RD after conversion

  • Market: Biofuels, Oil products
  • 01/04/24

Phillips 66's Rodeo, California, refinery is producing 30,000 b/d of renewable diesel (RD) after stopping crude processing in February and expects to produce sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) blendstocks this quarter.

Phillips 66 expects the plant to produce over 50,000 b/d of renewable fuels by the end of the second quarter, in line with previous announcements, and begin producing SAF blendstocks in the same period, the company said today.

The refinery previously processed 115,000 b/d of crude and other feedstocks before undergoing a multi-year conversion to solely process renewable feedstocks and produce renewable fuels.

The company previously said that once Rodeo's pre-treatment (PTU) unit is up and running it plans to start processing lower carbon intensity (CI) feedstocks such as fats, greases and tallows late in the second quarter and maybe into the third quarter.

Before the startup of the PTU, the plant will process used vegetable oil (UVO) and potentially used cooking oil (UCO) as well as neat vegetable oil, the company said on an earnings call in January.


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