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Shell buys Singapore LNG firm Pavilion Energy

  • Market: Natural gas
  • 18/06/24

Shell has bought from state-controlled investment firm Temasek the Singapore-based LNG firm Pavilion Energy, which currently has about 6.5mn t/yr of term contracted supplies.

The deal is expected to be finalised by next year's first quarter, subject to regulatory approvals and fulfilment of other conditions, Shell said on 18 June. Financial details of the acquisition were undisclosed.

Pavilion's term LNG supplies come from producers including Cheniere's 11.5mn t/yr Corpus Christi liquefaction facility in the US, the 22mn t/yr Bonny export terminal in Nigeria and Norway's 4.2mn t/yr Hammerfest export terminal.

The firm also operates in the LNG bunker market, tracking the growing number of LNG bunker vessels operating in Singapore. It supplied over 16-17 February the dual-fuel bulk carrier Mount Api with LNG through the firm's 12,000m³ Brassavola LNG bunkering vessel.

The Pavilion acquisition puts Shell in a position to capitalise on the growing LNG bunkering market. Demand for LNG as a bunker fuel in May at the port of Singapore touched a record high of 48,800t, on par with biofuels, according to the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore.

Pavilion Energy and Shell each hold one term LNG import licence for Singapore, granted by regulator the Energy Market Authority. The other two licence holders are ExxonMobil and Singapore's Sembcorp Fuels.


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25/07/24

Refining, LNG segments take Total’s profit lower in 2Q

Refining, LNG segments take Total’s profit lower in 2Q

London, 25 July (Argus) — TotalEnergies said today that a worsening performance at its downstream Refining & Chemicals business and its Integrated LNG segment led to a 7pc year-on-year decline in profit in the second quarter. Profit of $3.79bn was down from $5.72bn for the January-March quarter and from $4.09bn in the second quarter of 2023. When adjusted for inventory effects and special items, profit was $4.67bn — slightly lower than analysts had been expecting and 6pc down on the immediately preceding quarter. The biggest hit to profits was at the Refining & Chemicals segment, which reported an adjusted operating profit of $639mn for the April-June period, a 36pc fall on the year. Earlier in July, TotalEnergies had flagged lower refining margins in Europe and the Middle East, with its European Refining Margin Marker down by 37pc to $44.9/t compared with the first quarter. This margin decline was partially compensated for by an increase in its refineries' utilisation rate: to 84pc in April-June from 79pc in the first quarter. The company's Integrated LNG business saw a 13pc year on year decline in its adjusted operating profit, to $1.15bn. TotalEnergies cited lower LNG prices and sales, and said its gas trading operation "did not fully benefit in markets characterised by lower volatility than during the first half of 2023." A bright spot was the Exploration & Production business, where adjusted operating profit rose by 14pc on the year to $2.67bn. This was mainly driven by higher oil prices, which were partially offset by lower gas realisations and production. The company's second-quarter production averaged 2.44mn b/d of oil equivalent (boe/d), down by 1pc from 2.46mn boe/d reported for the January-March period and from the 2.47mn boe/d average in the second quarter of 2023. TotalEnergies attributed the quarter-on-quarter decline to a greater level of planned maintenance, particularly in the North Sea. But it said its underlying production — excluding the Canadian oil sands assets it sold last year — was up by 3pc on the year. This was largely thanks to the start up and ramp up of projects including Mero 2 offshore Brazil, Block 10 in Oman, Tommeliten Alpha and Eldfisk North in Norway, Akpo West in Nigeria and Absheron in Azerbaijan. TotalEnergies said production also benefited from its entry into the producing fields Ratawi, in Iraq, and Dorado in the US. The company expects production in a 2.4mn-2.45mn boe/d range in the third quarter, when its Anchor project in the US Gulf of Mexico is expected to start up. The company increased profit at its Integrated Power segment, which contains its renewables and gas-fired power operations. Adjusted operating profit rose by 12pc year-on-year to $502mn and net power production rose by 10pc to 9.1TWh. TotalEnergies' cash flow from operations, excluding working capital, was $7.78bn in April-June — an 8pc fall from a year earlier. The company has maintained its second interim dividend for 2024 at €0.79/share and plans to buy back up to $2bn of its shares in the third quarter, in line with its repurchases in previous quarters. By Jon Mainwaring Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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Repsol 2Q profit doubles but cash flow turns negative


24/07/24
News
24/07/24

Repsol 2Q profit doubles but cash flow turns negative

Madrid, 24 July (Argus) — Spanish integrated Repsol's profit more than doubled on the year in the second quarter, as lower one-time losses and better results in the upstream and customer divisions more than offset a weaker refining performance. But its cash flow turned negative as it completed the buyout of its UK joint venture with China's state-controlled Sinopec, raised investments and experienced weaker refining margins. Net debt was sharply higher, largely reflecting share buy-backs. Repsol has said it will acquire and cancel a further 20mn of its own shares before the end of the year, which will probably further increase its debt. It completed a 40mn buy-back in the first half of the year. Repsol's profit climbed to €657mn ($714mn) in April-June from €308mn a year earlier, when earnings were hit by a large provision against an arbitration ruling that obliged it to acquire Sinopec's stake in their UK joint venture. Excluding this and other special items, such as a near threefold reduction in the negative inventory effect to €85mn, Repsol's adjusted profit increased by 4pc on the year to €859mn. Repsol confirmed the fall in refining margins and upstream production reported earlier in July . Liquids output increased by 3pc on the year to 214,000 b/d, and gas production fell by 4pc to 2.1bn ft³/d. Adjusted upstream profit increased by 4pc on the year to €427mn. The higher crude production and a 13pc rise in realised prices to $78.6/bl more than offset lower gas production and prices, which fell by 6pc to $3.1/'000 ft³ over the same period. Adjusted profit at Repsol's industrial division — which includes 1mn b/d of Spanish and Peruvian refining capacity, an olefins-focused petrochemicals division, and a gas and oil product trading business — was down by 16pc on the year at €288mn. Profit fell at the 117,000 b/d Pampilla refinery in Peru after a turnaround and weak refining margins, and there was lower income from gas trading. Spanish refining profit rose on a higher utilisation rate and gains in oil product trading. Repsol's customer-focused division reported adjusted profit of €158mn in April-June, 7pc higher on the year thanks to higher retail electricity margins, a jump in sales from an expanded customer base, higher margins in aviation fuels and higher sales volumes in lubricants. Repsol swung to a negative free cash flow, before shareholder remuneration and buy-backs, of €574mn in the second quarter, from a positive €392mn a year earlier. After shareholder remuneration, including the share buy-backs and dividends, Repsol had a negative cash position of €1.12bn compared with a positive €133mn a year earlier. Repsol's net debt more than doubled to €4.595bn at the end of June from €2.096bn on 31 December 2023, reflecting the share buy-backs and new leases of equipment. By Jonathan Gleave Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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Equinor 2Q profit supported by higher European output


24/07/24
News
24/07/24

Equinor 2Q profit supported by higher European output

London, 24 July (Argus) — Norway's state-controlled Equinor posted a small rise in profit on the year in the April-June period, as a lift in its European production offset lower gas prices. Equinor reported a profit of $1.87bn in the second quarter, up by 2.2pc on the year but down by 30pc from the first three months of 2024. The company paid two Norwegian corporation tax instalments, totalling $6.98bn, in the second quarter, compared with one in the first quarter. Equinor paid $7.85bn in tax in April-June in total. Its average liquids price in the second quarter was $77.6/bl, up by 10pc from the second quarter of 2023. But average gas prices for Equinor's Norwegian and US production fell in the same period by 17pc and 6pc, respectively. The company noted "strong operational performance and lower impact from turnarounds" on the Norwegian offshore, including new output from the Breidablikk field . Equinor's entitlement production was 1.92mn b/d of oil equivalent (boe/d) in April-June, up by 3pc on the year. The company cited "high production" from Norway's Troll and Oseberg fields in the second quarter, as well as new output from the UK's Buzzard field. But US output slid, owing to offshore turnarounds and "planned curtailments onshore to capture higher value when demand is higher", the company said. It estimates oil and gas production across 2024 will be "stable" compared with last year, while its renewable power generation is expected to increase by around 70pc across the same timespan. Equinor's share of power generation rose by 14pc on the year to 1.1TWh in April-June. Of this, 655GWh was renewables — almost doubling on the year — driven by new onshore wind capacity in Brazil and Poland. "Construction is progressing" on the UK's 1.2GW Dogger Bank A offshore windfarm , Equinor said. It is aiming for full commercial operations in the first half of 2025 at Dogger Bank A — a joint venture with UK utility SSE. Equinor was granted three new licences in June to develop CO2 storage in Norway and Denmark. The Norwegian licences — Albondigas and Kinno — together have CO2 storage potential of 10mn t/yr. The Danish onshore licence, for which Equinor was awarded a 60pc stake, has potential capacity of 12mn t/yr. Equinor has a goal of 30mn-50mn t/yr of CO2 transport and storage capacity by 2035. The company's scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions amounted to 5.6mn t/CO2 equivalent (CO2e) in the first half of the year, edging lower from 5.8mn t/CO2e in January-June 2023. It also incrementally cut its upstream CO2 intensity, from 6.7 kg/boe across 2023, to 6.3 kg/boe in the first half of this year. Equinor has kept its ordinary cash dividend steady , at $0.35/share, and will continue the extraordinary cash dividend of $0.35/share for the second quarter. It will launch a third $1.6bn tranche of its share buyback programme on 25 July. By Georgia Gratton Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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Gas discovery could extend Bolivia's export life


22/07/24
News
22/07/24

Gas discovery could extend Bolivia's export life

Sao Paulo, 22 July (Argus) — The estimated 1.7 Tcf of natural gas in Bolivia's Mayaya Centro-X1 field would expand the country's exporting capacity in 4-5 years but not much beyond that, according to market participants. The discovery — the largest find in Bolivia since 2005 and the first in the north of the country — was well-received in Bolivia and in neighboring countries. But some are skeptical about whether it actually holds 1.7 Tcf. "The government may be jumping to conclusions given the elements available so far," a hydrocarbons market consultant told Argus . Prior to the discovery, Bolivia was expected to cease exporting gas in 2030. By then, considering proved reserves, production will only be enough to supply domestic demand. Additionally, there are some logistics concerns, as the region around the Mayaya Centro-X1 field has no infrastructure for further exploration or pipeline transport systems. The mayor of the Bolivian capital La Paz, Iva Arias, said a hydrocarbons field would take 2-5 years to produce and start yielding royalties for the city. But if the reserves are indeed proven, the discovery would change Bolivia's natural gas reality, as its reserves dropped by around 70pc in the last decade. The expectations surrounding the find are added to the increasingly public animosity between President Luis Arce and former-president Evo Morales, his former boss. Both are claiming credit for the discovery and will use it to promote their 2025 presidential runs . Bolivia is still the largest exporters of natural gas to Brazil. State-controlled Petrobras and Bolivia's state-owned YPFB are partners in four Bolivian fields. Only four days prior to Mayaya Centro-X1 announcement, newly-appointed Petrobras chief executive Magda Chambriard visited Bolivia with Brazilan President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva and announced plans to invest $40mn to drill an exploratory well in San Telmo Norte in 2025. Brazilian company Flxus also plans to invest in Bolivian gas . By Betina Moura Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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Yara second-quarter gas consumption jumps on year


22/07/24
News
22/07/24

Yara second-quarter gas consumption jumps on year

London, 22 July (Argus) — Fertilizer producer Yara's European gas consumption jumped by more than 40pc on the year in the second quarter and was also higher than in the previous three months. Yara's gas consumption in Europe totalled 34 trillion Btu, drastically up from 24 trillion Btu in the second quarter of 2023 and 29.2 trillion Btu in January-March . Yara did not report its European ammonia production for the second quarter, but its global output totalled 1.78mn t, well up from 1.42mn t a year earlier. Much lower prices encouraged Yara to lift its European production. Yara's European gas costs averaged $9.70/mn Btu in April-June, down from $14.30/mn Btu in the same period of 2023 and the lowest for any quarter since Yara started reporting these numbers in the third quarter of 2021. The firm's European gas costs have fallen sharply since peaking at $34.50/mn Btu in the third quarter of 2022, when European wholesale prices hit all-time highs (see price graph) . Yara's quarterly spending on European gas of $330mn in April-June was the lowest since at least summer 2021, and less than a third of the $1.08bn peak in April-June 2022. Argus assessed European ammonia production prices based on the TTF front-month price at roughly a $90/t discount to northwest European import prices in its last weekly assessment on 18 July, suggesting a significant financial incentive to produce ammonia domestically. Higher ammonia production in Europe helped spur a 7pc rise in deliveries of finished products to the region , which Yara attributed to a belated spring season and the launch of its new season price. Despite Yara's European gas costs being lower than at any other point since summer 2021, it announced a cost and capital expenditure (capex) reduction plan that could see the company focus on using imported low-carbon ammonia in its European fertilizer production, with a potential closure of European assets not ruled out. The company aims to reduce both its costs and capex by $150mn compared with the past 12 months by the end of 2025. Yara emphasised that its ammonia system is the largest and most flexible in the world, and highly scalable. "We can increase the volumes we import and export significantly at a low investment level," it said. Yara already reduced the valuation and expected lifecycle of its Tertre plant in Belgium , one of the company's few European plants that cannot be supplied with imported ammonia. Global production Yara consumed 56.4 trillion Btu of gas globally in April-June, up on the quarter but still below a multi-year high of 61.9 trillion Btu in October-December (see consumption graph). Europe accounted for roughly 60pc of Yara's global gas consumption in the second quarter, up from 54pc in January-March and 51pc in the same period last year. Yara's global average gas cost was $7.90/mn Btu last quarter, 19pc below its reported European cost. That discount has been a significant driver for Yara and others to increase production abroad rather than in Europe over the past two years. Yara forecasts its European gas costs at $10.90/mn Btu and $11/mn Btu in the third and fourth quarters of this year, respectively, well above its global average gas costs of $8.80/mn Btu and $8.90/mn Btu during those same periods. By Brendan A'Hearn Yara European vs global gas consumption million MMBtu Yara European vs global gas costs $/MMBtu Send comments and request more information at feedback@argusmedia.com Copyright © 2024. Argus Media group . All rights reserved.

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